Tag Archives: allyson felix

The Morning Run- June 3rd

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Prefontaine Classic concluded yesterday at Hayward Field in Eugene with its typical array of fast times and competitive races.  Aside from that, the meet also featured Liu Xiang attempting to dance, Allyson Felix bringing back the bodysuit and Abubaker Kaki shaving a Nike swoosh into his hair (at about 2:05).

Full results from the meet can be found here.

Much of our post-race discussion on the live chat centered around the uncertainty of the American men in the 1500.  Andrew Wheating, Lopez Lomong and Leo Manzano were all non-factors in the Bowerman Mile, as was Bernard Lagat, who will be focusing on the 5,000 at the Olympic Trials.  Friday’s International Mile did not provide many answers, as Matt Centrowitz looked rusty. David Torrence and Russell Brown were the lone bright spots, but neither has made an international team.

Justin Gatlin won the 100 in 9.90 and appears ready, willing and able to take on the villain role throughout the summer.  His past history of doping (of which he has never admitted) stands in stark contrast with the charisma and universal popularity of Usain Bolt.  9.90 is a long way from the 9.76 Bolt just ran in Rome a few days ago in Rome, but Gatlin is putting up consistent enough times that he could pose a threat.  Also, the two seem to have some history (see the last 5 paragraphs of this story where Bolt alleges Gatlin spit in his lane at a meet last year).

With each race it becomes clearer that Gatlin will make the American squad for London.  Tyson Gay has yet to surface and Walter Dix suffered an injury yesterday that casts some doubt on his form.  Even accounting for those two, it is tough to envision a scenario where Gatlin is outside the top three.  An even more difficult proposition is seeing a way that Gatlin, even in the red, white and blue in London, is fully embraced by American fans, much less the world.  Not so much for the doping past and the brash statements, but because he will be in opposition to Bolt, the track and field uniter.

Ken Goe’s meet story focuses on Mo Farah and Galen Rupp’s performances in the 5,000.

George Schroeder on the excitement of Liu Xiang.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 31st

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Make sure to check out our most recent podcast with Joe Battaglia of NBC Olympics.  Joe gives a great preview of the Prefontaine Classic and the Rome Golden Gala and also comments on the hype surrounding Lolo Jones, Allyson Felix’s double and the Kenyan Olympic selection process.

Speaking of Joe Battaglia, he introduces the 14 men running in the Kenyan Olympic 10,000 Trials at Hayward Field on Friday night, and previews today’s meet in Rome.

Dai Greene is out of the 400 hurdles in Rome with an illness.  Apparently, policing all of track and field can get pretty taxing.

Add “Visa issues” to the list of items that ail track and field.  Cuban hurdle superstar Dayron Robles may be out of the Prefontaine Classic due to a delay in obtaining his Visa.

TYSON GAY SIGHTINING TYSON GAY SIGHTING.  He only runs about 30 meters on a high school track, but there is a real starter’s pistol and he is using blocks.  In all seriousness, there is a chance that he will debut this weekend on his home track in Clermont.

Asafa Powell believes he can win it all in London.  He is serious this time.

2000 gold medalist Cathy Freeman reflects on her Olympic experience and says she doesn’t have much advice for her countrywoman, Sally Pearson.  The only advice should be:

1) Wear a bodysuit

2) Dominate the last ¼ of your race

Desiree Davila and Edna Kiplagat will meet next week in the NYRR New York Mini 10k.  Despite its name, it is still 10 kilometers.

Pat Price asks Augustine Choge 5 questions.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 7th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Jamaica Invitational headlines this edition of the Morning Run.  Despite running woefully behind schedule (so much so that the satellite window closed before the men’s and women’s 200m races) the meet featured several gold medal favorites and the deepest sprint fields thus far in 2012.

Usain Bolt had his fastest debut ever in the 100 with a 9.82 win.  Michael Frater and Lerone Clarke pushed him, but Bolt, and the jersey featuring his face, was too much over the last 30 meters.

Sanya Richards-Ross lost her race, and her world lead, to Novelene Williams-Mills in the 400.

Carmelita Jeter didn’t look at the top of her game, but she still ran a world-leading 10.81.

A bulked up Yohan Blake won the men’s 200 in 19.91.   Last year, it took Bolt a few months to look like his old self after putting on muscle in the off-season.

In a mild upset, Bianca Knight ran down Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce in the women’s 200.

The rest of the professional results, including Bershawn Jackson and Brigitte Foster Hylton, are here.

In Kawasaki, Allyson Felix won the 100 in 11.22, Liu Xiang went 13.09 in the 110 hurdles and Amantle Montsho ran 50.52 in the 400.

Andrew Wheating returned to racing at the Oregon Twilight and won in “epic Wheating fashion.”  Bridget Franek also starred with a world-lead in the steeplechase.

It was a two steps back weekend for Alan Webb at the Duke Twilight.

Jesse Squire’s first member of his dual meet hall of fame.

The New York Times on Ashton Eaton, his coach Harry Marra, and the potential of a US sweep in London.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 23

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Wilson Kipsang and Mary Keitany were the winners of the London Marathon.

Science of Sport breaks down the race.

Now that the spring marathon season has concluded, Toni Reavis and Joe Battaglia speculate about the Olympic selection process for Kenya and Ethiopia.

Track and Field News also weighs in on the impending selection.

At the Mt. SAC Relays, Martyn Rooney and Jeremy Wariner both broke 45 seconds in the 400.

Walter Dix ran 9.85 in a race that also featured Mike Rodgers.  Even with the wind, that is a vey fast time for Dix.

Allyson Felix made some poor woman look silly on the anchor leg of the 4 x 100.

World champion Jason Richardson ran 13.20 (+3.7) in the 110 hurdles.

At the Kansas Relays, Bershawn Jackson ran a world-leading time in the 400 hurdlesDai Greene, what have you done?

Sanya Richards-Ross ran a very-impressive-for-April time of 50.18 in Waco, Texas.

What did German high jumper Ariane Friedrich do when a stalker sent her lewd pictures?

The USATF needs to do a better job capitalizing on the Olympic popularity of track, opines Red Shannon.

Usain Bolt will run his first open 100 in Kingston in two weeks.   #OMGBOLT

The Turbaned Tornado- the 101-year old marathoner- has retired from the distance.  He has not ruled out the steeplechase.

NPR profile on Nick Symmonds.  Cue soothing NPR voices.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 17th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Still recovering from Marathon Monday, so The Morning Run will be a bit shorter today.  Our full podcast will be posted later this evening.

In the light of Geoffrey Mutai’s DNF, Joe Battaglia tries to get to the bottom of the Kenyan Olympic selection process.

Wesley Korir’s post race press conference.

Science of Sport analyzes the role that heat played in Monday’s race.

Sports Illustrated’s Tim Layden tweets news of Allyson Felix’s Olympic plans.

UK Athletics coach Charles van Commenee is either an evil genius, or just evil.

The elite fields for Sunday’s London Marathon.

-Kevin

 

 

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 10th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, Amby Burfoot of Runner’s World suggested changing the qualification procedure for the marathon in the Olympics.  Rather than base it on the three-per-nation limit, Burfoot wants a system where the best marathoners, regardless of nationality, all compete.  His full proposal is here, but the result for 2012 would be a field of seventeen Kenyans, two Ethiopians and one American.  By now, we are all well versed in the Kenyan and Ethiopian dominance of the event and how the Kenyan team this year will have to leave off several sub 2:06 performers.

Does the fact that the Olympics won’t have the deepest and best marathon in the world bother me?  Not entirely, because the Olympics aim to be about the participation of nations, rather than the greatest congregation of talent.  However, the real issue I have with Burfoot’s idea is that it doesn’t expand the field enough.

The tweak I would make to the race would allow Kenya (and other power countries) more entries than they hold currently, preserve the current state of the race and add a team component.  Here’s how it would work:

-Nation’s enter as five member teams.  This allows for two extra entries than the current system.  Does this mean there will still be deserving Kenyans and Ethiopians that will be left home? Certainly, but it is better to apologize to the 6th best than the 4th.

-In order to qualify as a team, at least 3 from your country must have met the “A” standard.  When looking at the numbers (keep in mind I did this just looking at 2011 times and for just the men’s field), only nine teams would qualify if all five members had to meet the “A” standard (Kenyan, Ethiopia, USA, Eritrea, Morocco, Japan, Russia, Poland, France), but if I opened it up to only three needing the standard, then nine more nations became eligible.  In these nations they often had several entrants that were just off the 2:15 “A” standard, so I didn’t feel that they overall competitiveness would be impacted by the presence of their 4th and 5th team members.

-Individuals from non-qualifying nations can still qualify by meeting the “A” standard.

-The team competition would be scored just like a cross country meet, except only the first four would count.  Medals would be distributed for the team competition as well as the individuals .

Obviously, there are many minor changes that could be made depending on the number of qualifiers and how many make the “A” standard on a given year.  If 18 teams made it, that would mean 90 runners would be a part of the team competition and it would still leave plenty of room for deserving individuals to represent their country.  The drama would extend from the front of the pack all the way to the back, and the US might even have a chance to snag a bronze every now and then.

The rest of The Morning Run…….

In The Sun’s article about Christine Ohuruogu, Allyson Felix says she is training for a double and is even considering racing the 100 instead of the 400, in addition to her favored 200.  She was .03 from a gold last summer in Daegu in the 400 and has never been a factor in the 100, so I’m a bit doubtful that she opts for the 100.

Ken Goe’s links.

Jesse Squire delivers his college awards from the past weekend.

Comedian Eddie Izzard runs with Haile Gebrselassie and discovers that Gebreselassie, and Ethiopia, are a bit confused by barefoot running.

Revealing Q and A with Usain Bolt where you discover that his training is in fact going well and that he wants to defend his Olympic titles in London.

More Bolt, he is scheduled to race a leg of the 4 x 100 this weekend at the UTech ClassicYohan Blake will run the 100 as well.

British marathoner Paula Radcliffe says she would be happy with a bronze at the Olympics.  That should take some pressure off.

Lolo Jones may not race in her home state at next weekend’s Drake Relays.

-Kevin

Episode 11: Interview with Ato Boldon

Ato Boldon joins the podcast and discusses  broadcasting, Twitter,  sprinting and his new show, Foot Race.

 

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