Tag Archives: asafa powell

The Morning Run- June 8th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Oslo’s stop on the Diamond League was Thursday and although the fields were a bit diluted with the New York meet on Saturday, there were still some significant takeaways.

Asafa Powell looked like a bona fide silver medal contender.  He lost to Usain Bolt, but he ran a season best time of 9.85 and appeared to run all the way through the line.

Yes, Bolt did almost take out the flower girl.

Abebe Aragawi is shaping up to be the Morgan Uceny of 2012.  Last week she won in a fast 3:56 in Rome, yesterday she ran a smart, savvy race to win in 4:02.  The sample size is very small, but so far she has shown the versatility to make her a favorite the rest of the summer.  As for the real Uceny, she finished 6th in 4:05.  She didn’t really get going last year until after the U.S. championships, so I wouldn’t count her out yet.

There was good news and bad news for Lolo Jones.  The good, she ran a season best time of 12.75 and beat last year’s silver medalist Danielle Carruthers.  The bad, the extraordinarily deep American 100 hurdles field, got even deeper with the emergence of Kristi Castlin.  After a stellar indoor season, Castlin finished 2nd yesterday in 12.56.  Sally Pearson’s dominance would be boring if she wasn’t so fun to watch.

Is Kenenisa Bekele improving or flat lining?  He ran his fastest time of the season, 13:00.54, but finished only 5th.  Worse than that, he lost to his younger brother and everyone knows how awful that is.  Oslo was his fourth Diamond League race of the season and he has shown steady improvement, but has yet to have the breakthrough race that truly signals his return.

There are still two more days of racing in Des Moines at the NCAA ChampionshipsJesse Squire gives you the low down on day three.

If you are watching the NCAA meet for runners that will have an impact at the US Olympic Trials, keep your eye on Kimberlyn Duncan, English Gardner and Octavious Freemon in the women’s 100, Tony McQuay and Mike Berry in the men’s 400 and Harry Adams and Maurice Mitchell in the men’s 100.

What to watch for at Saturday’s Diamond League meet in New York.

Desiree Davila answers Joe Battaglia’s questions

Battaglia also features the frequently overlooked Kelly-Ann Baptiste.

NBC’s Rock Center profiles Oscar Pistorius.

The Tonight Show went to Chula Vista, California and sampled some track and field events.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- June 5th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Tyson Gay will make his 2012 debut in New York at the Adidas Grand Prix on Saturday.  Gay will be in the “B” section and will not be racing head-to-head with 2011 world champion Yohan Blake.   Gay, and his agent Mark Wetmore, cited preparedness issues as the reason he would not be racing in the premiere section.  In the same article, Wetmore says that Gay could be ready for something in the 9.9s on Saturday.

Whether or not that is realistic is debatable, but the fact that it is even being considered seems to undermine the unpreparedness  argument for why Gay needs to be in a separate section.  Nobody begrudges him if he needs a tune-up race and can’t touch a sub-10 yet, but claiming he isn’t race-ready and then floating 9.9 is highly contradictory.  Regardless, this should be the most anticipated “B” section of 2012

The most recent start lists for New York can be found here.

The NCAA Championships begin on Wednesday and run through Saturday.  Track and Field News produced women’s and men’s form charts.

The most recent start lists for the Bislett Games, Oslo’s stop on the Diamond League have been posted.  Some races to keep an eye on:

Can Usain Bolt improve on his world leading 9.76 in the 100 “against” Asafa Powell

Lolo Jones will try to get back on track in the 100 hurdles against Sally Pearson, Kristi Castlin, Tiffany Porter and Jessica Ennis.

Kenenisa Bekele, Tariku Bekele, Dejen Gebremeskel, Imane Merga and the rest of the strong Ethiopian contingent will battle for Olympic spots in the men’s 5000. 

American Morgan Uceny will try to close the gap on breakout Ethiopians Abeba Aregwai, Genzebe Dibaba in the 1500.    

Ken Goe’s links from Monday.

Writer David Davis is writing a book on the first woman to run a marathonMerry Lepper.  Hard to believe it was in 1963.

Start list for the Portland Track Festival, which features Dathan Ritzenhein and Lauren Fleshman.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 31st

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Make sure to check out our most recent podcast with Joe Battaglia of NBC Olympics.  Joe gives a great preview of the Prefontaine Classic and the Rome Golden Gala and also comments on the hype surrounding Lolo Jones, Allyson Felix’s double and the Kenyan Olympic selection process.

Speaking of Joe Battaglia, he introduces the 14 men running in the Kenyan Olympic 10,000 Trials at Hayward Field on Friday night, and previews today’s meet in Rome.

Dai Greene is out of the 400 hurdles in Rome with an illness.  Apparently, policing all of track and field can get pretty taxing.

Add “Visa issues” to the list of items that ail track and field.  Cuban hurdle superstar Dayron Robles may be out of the Prefontaine Classic due to a delay in obtaining his Visa.

TYSON GAY SIGHTINING TYSON GAY SIGHTING.  He only runs about 30 meters on a high school track, but there is a real starter’s pistol and he is using blocks.  In all seriousness, there is a chance that he will debut this weekend on his home track in Clermont.

Asafa Powell believes he can win it all in London.  He is serious this time.

2000 gold medalist Cathy Freeman reflects on her Olympic experience and says she doesn’t have much advice for her countrywoman, Sally Pearson.  The only advice should be:

1) Wear a bodysuit

2) Dominate the last ¼ of your race

Desiree Davila and Edna Kiplagat will meet next week in the NYRR New York Mini 10k.  Despite its name, it is still 10 kilometers.

Pat Price asks Augustine Choge 5 questions.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 18th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

There is still about 1 day to get in the House of Run fantasy track and field league.  If you would like to join, go here and join the league “House of Run Podcast.”  The league pin is 167961.  Make your picks for Shanghai!

There are two meets to keep an eye on this weekend.  First, the Occidental High Performance meet on Friday will have 800, 1500, 5000 and 3000 steeplechases races featuring many of the fastest Americans.  I will be helping out with the free, live coverage that begins at 6:30 pm PST.

The Diamond League’s second stop is Saturday’s meet in ShanghaiJoe Battaglia of NBC Olympics runs down all the races to watch and the storylines to follow.

Asafa Powell says, “Many track and field people know that if I stay relaxed and run my race like I’m supposed to, I will be the winner at the Olympic Games.”  The “ifs” have always been Powell’s problem.

Flotrack interviews the 2011 triple jump world champion, Christian Taylor.

Ken Goe’s links from Thursday, including a brief interview with Jerry Schumacher, the coach of the Oregon Track Club/Portland.

Bonnie Ford of ESPN interviews the American marathon Olympic team.  The key revelations are that Ryan Hall knows exactly how far the Olympic village is from the stadium, Abdi Abdirahman thinks a four-mile walk is a workout, and Meb Keflezighi is no fan of U-turns.

Rich Perelman wants a NCAA track and field playoff.

Paavo Nurmi’s win in the 1924 5,000 makes The Guardian’s “50 Stunning Olympic Moments” list.

I’m off to Oxy (and to eat here first)!

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 14th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

On Saturday, we posted our interview with Adharanand Finn, the author of Running with the Kenyans.  If you haven’t yet listened, please do, especially if you are interested in what makes the Kenyans so dominant.  We will post our recap podcast for the Doha Diamond League, NCAA conference championships and much more tomorrow.

All of the results from the NCAA conference championships can be found here.

More in-depth conference recaps on the Big 12, SEC and the Pac 12.

Jesse Squires analyzes the attendance from the NCAA conference championships.

Ashton Eaton hurdles over a model.  A model wearing a $4,490 dress nonetheless.

Dan Rubenstein and Matt Ufford of SB Nation highlight the best fails in track and fieldGabriela Szabo getting lit up on the long jump runway still makes me cringe.

ESPN’s Outside the Lines profiles University of Alaska-Anchorage runner Marko Cheseto and his tale of survival in the Alaskan wilderness.

Lashinda Demus: “we know that we are competing in a dying sport.”

Nike’s new speed suits feature “golf ball-inspired dimples” and claim to reduce times by .023 seconds over 100 meters.  By my math, that can be extrapolated out to 2.3 seconds for the 10,000 so look for skinny distance runners to start sporting the dimples.

Asafa Powell does what he normally does after he loses a race.  Also, Justin Gatlin calls Powell, “just a runner.”

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 9th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our podcast from yesterday, which started as a recap of the results from Kingston, but ended as a referendum on the movie Without Limits, is up.

The IOC will retest doping samples from the 2004 Olympics.

The Guardian speculates about a potential match-up between David Rudisha and Usain Bolt in the 4 x 400 at the Olympics.  Throw in Oscar PistoriusLashawn Merritt and Dai Greene and we would have something akin to a running apocalypse.   Also, you have to love Rudisha’s epic understatement, “Bolt is fast, he has speed, that I don’t have.”

Bolt says he needs to run fast and win in London.  Not sure why this still qualifies as news.

Joe Battaglia profiles Julius Yego, the Kenyan javelin thrower.

Carmelita Jeter, Yohan Blake and Novelene Williams-Mills will all be running at today’s Cayman Invitational.

The preliminary start lists for the Oxy High Performance meet are out.  The mid-distance races are filled with big names.

Does Asafa Powell get a fair shake in Jamaica?  I vote yes, almost too fair.

Jesse Squire names another member of his Dual Meet Hall of Fame.

Ken Goe’s Tuesday links.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 3rd

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

If you haven’t do so yet, check out the podcast from this week. In it, Jason and I discuss the Penn Relays, Lopez Lomong’s miscalcuation, Wallace Spearmon’s record and Michael Jordan’s executive skills.

Asafa Powell may not race in Kingston on Saturday.  Whether it has been injuries or an overly selective race schedule, Powell is slowly fading from being a significant figure in the sprinting world.

Patrick Makau says he dropped out of this year’s London Marathon because he thought he had already secured a spot on the Olympic team.  Geoffrey Mutai is probably the only person who believes this.

A new angle of the Katy Andrews steeplechase fall has been posted.  In the last two days, the video has been featured on ESPN, USA Today and Deadspin.  Track may not be mainstream, but falling into water certainly is.

In his second article on the topic, Rich Perelman thinks “track and field and TV need to get married.”  It is very difficult to argue with the benefit of more television exposure and the ideas that Perelman presents are the type of dramatic changes that are needed to see track and field grow.  More on this tomorrow.

Toni Reavis wants to see more participation in road races in the Olympics.  I agree.

Jesse Squire looks at Cam Levins’ “unusual year.”

NBC Olympics asks Trey Hardee about playing guitar.

What do elite distance runners eat for breakfast?  Flotrack’s Ryan Fenton found out.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 14th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Rotterdam Marathon is on Sunday and the Boston Marathon is Monday.  Both races have huge implications for the Kenyan and Ethiopian Olympic teams and there is a world record attempt in the men’s race in Rotterdam.  On last week’s show, Jason and I made the following predictions:

Boston

Men:

Kevin: Geoffrey Mutai, Wilson Chebet, Wesley Korir

Jason: Geoffrey Mutai, Matthew Kisorio, Gebre Gebremariam

Women:

Kevin: Buzunesh Deba, Firehiwot Dado, Aselefech Mergia (she may be a scratch)

Jason: Firehiwot Dado, Caroline Kilel, Buzunesh Deba

Rotterdam

Men:

Kevin: Moses Mosop (2:03:50), Peter Kirui, Sammy Kitwara

Jason: Moses Mosop (WR, but not faster than 2:03:02), Sammy Kitwara, Peter Kirui

It is supposed to be very hot in Boston on race day.

The Boston Globe gives a sample week of Geoffrey Mutai’s training.  It is filled with running.

Here are some training videos and interviews with Peter Kirui and Moses Mosop during their preparations for the Rotterdam Marathon.  Dutch subtitles are available for all of our readers in the Netherlands.

For Sunday’s Vienna Half Marathon, Paula Radcliffe will have a 7:52 head start on Haile Gebrselassie.  The time was decided on their respective bests in the event, which I believe gives the edge to Radcliffe.

Saturday’s UTech Classic in Jamaica features Yohan Blake in the 100, Asafa Powell in the 200 and Blake, Powell and Usain Bolt in the 4 x 100.

SB Nation reporter, and friend of the House of Run, Dan Rubenstein interviews Sanya Richards-Ross in his quest to find his favorite Olympic sport.  Veterans of the House of Run will remember Dan as the person who correctly picked Firehiwot Dado to win last year’s New York City Marathon on our preview podcast last November.

Joe Battaglia asks 10 questions to Yelena Isinbayeva.  Unfortunately, Joe does not get a firm answer on what she says to her pole.

You know it is the heart of spring when there is uproar about a high school track athlete getting disqualified for jewelry.  At some point, high school officials and rule makers decided that the most important aspect of all of track and field to emphasize was uniform compliance.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 12th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our most recent podcast is here.  In it, Jason and I discuss the Stanford InvitationalFlorida Relays, the upcoming Boston and Rotterdam marathons and the trailer to the movie “Fast Girls.”

David Epstein of Sports Illustrated wrote a fantastic article on the late Sammy Wanjiru.  Epstein also appeared on the Sports Illustrated podcast.  I highly recommend both.

Philip Hersh reports that sprinter Marshevet Hooker is pregnant and will not compete at the Olympics.  Hooker was on the 2008 team and was 8th at last year’s World Championships.  Nick Zaccardi of Sports Illustrated points out that Hooker’s absence potentially makes room for collegians English Gardner and Octavious Freeman.  However, Hooker’s experience, and speed, will be missed on the 4 x 100 relay where the US is trying to beat the Jamaican squad for a second year in a row.  It was Hooker’s leg last year (3rd leg) that blew the race open and carried them to victory.

Australian pole vaulter Steve Hooker now trains in a “Bat Cave” and appears to be on the comeback after suffering from the “yips” in 2011.

A North Korean marathon exists…….and had a great finish……. and an interesting press release.  The winning time of 2:12:54 was well off King Jong Il’s 1:59:59 course record.

David Rudisha plans only three races before London.  Not sure if this includes the Kenyan Trials.

Lashawn Merritt wants to race NFL stars after his season is over.  I am sure there is a long line of NFL players just waiting to get exposed by Merritt in a 100.

The Kenyan 10,000 meter team, which will ultimately be decided in Eugene at the Prefontaine Classic, has cut the field down to 30.  Another 15 will be cut after a race in Kenya next week.

Guardian retrospective on the life and death of Florence Griffith-Joyner.

Yohan Blake and Asafa Powell are not racing this weekend, but will be at the same meet.  Who could have seen this coming?

Blake is planning to double in the 100 and 200 in London.  I will have more on this decision, and other key Olympic track and field decisions, on tomorrow’s Morning Run.

Science of Sport’s “Around the Rings” column features 3 topics on running.

Pat Price reviews the documentary, “Town of Runners.”

After saying that she would be satisfied with a bronze, Paula Radcliffe now sees gold in marathon at London as “realistic.”  The British press have already begun salivating and frantically searching the internet for synonyms for “failure.”

The top American marks of the outdoor season thus far.

-Kevin