Tag Archives: boston marathon

Episode 206: London Marathon Recap/Boston Marathon Preview

Jason and Kevin discuss Wilson Kipsang’s course record, Mo Farah’s debut, the dropped water bottle by Tirunesh Dibaba and all the other highlights of the 2014 London Marathon.  Is Kipsang now the best marathoner in the world?  Why was the criticism of Farah so harsh?  Did the pacemakers hurt both the men’s and women’s races?

Then, the guys look ahead to the Boston Marathon and weigh Shalane Flanagan’s bid to be the first American women’s winner in almost 30 years.  In the men’s race, Kevin wonders if anyone can contend with Dennis Kimetto and Jason’s breaks down Ryan Hall and Meb Keflezighi’s chances.

The Morning Run: January 18th

Because you can’t spend all your time reading about Manti Te’o….

-Jim McDannald of Track Focus reports that the Pac-12 is currently blocking Flotrack, Runnerspace and any other outside enterprise from streaming or archiving meets that are hosted by a Pac-12 school.  This decision gets even more puzzling when you consider that the Pac-12 may not even broadest these meets themselves.  This was the case at last Saturday’s University of Washington Indoor Preview.  Because of the large amount of college/professional meets that Pac-12 schools host, this policy would blackout fans from watching several marquee meets that have been previously available for viewing.

The development of propriety conference networks, and the huge amount of money that follows, is often cited as the savior of non-revenue sports.   It is interesting that these same networks could play a role in limiting the publicity of their schools and their athletes.

-Mo Farah will run one, and only one, indoor race this season.  Meanwhile, training partner Galen Rupp will race for the second time in 2013 at next Saturday’s BU Terrier Invite.

-Tirunesh Dibaba and Matt Centrowitz are the latest entries to the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix.

-Ken Goe’s Thursday links include a look at the relationship between Oregon’s football and track and field programs.

-Jesse Squire presents his College Notes.

-Our podcast from Wednesday where we discuss Mary Cain, the Boston Marathon field, Andy Murray’s acceleration and much more.

The Morning Run: January 15th

Because at least Lance Armstrong isn’t involved in track and field…. 

-Thanks to friend of the podcast Julian for notifying us that Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is running indoors for what appears to be the first time in her career.  She told the Jamaican Gleaner over the weekend that she will use the indoor season to prepare for outdoors and will presumably race the 60-meters.  Does this mean we might see a women’s sprint world record this winter?  Discounting relays, hurdles and oddball events like the 100-yard dash or the 150-meters, the most recent women’s sprint record is from February 9, 1995.   That year, Irina Privalova of Russia equaled her mark of 6.92 in the 60-meters from 1993.   By comparison, virtually every men’s record has been broken (and re-broken) during that same time period.

Could Fraser-Pryce break the 18-year drought?  Perhaps, if she gets enough chances.  Her start and drive phase are the strongest part of her race and she has already run, according to the awesome, but highly addictive alltime-athletics.com, 6.88 en route to her win in the 100-meters at the 2009 World Championships.

She could run into some problems finding ample opportunities.  The IAAF lists only six “IAAF Indoor Permit” races this season, three of which are on the same weekend.  Of course that doesn’t include the Millrose Games and other non-IAAF affiliated meets, but I’m guessing she will want to attempt it at a bigger budget meet.  All this to say, Millrose should pay her a bunch of money to race for the record against Chris Johnson, Denard Robinson and Adrian Peterson.

-The international field for the Boston Marathon was released today.   Things got a bit tougher for Ryan Hall, Shalane Flanagan and the rest of the Americans.

-Alan Webb explains his new training under Jerry Schumacher of the Oregon Track Club Elite group in Portland.  Schumacher is Webb’s fifth coach since high school.

-Ken Goe’s links from Monday.

-The next stop on the Mary Cain Show will be Boston for the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix.

The Morning Run: January 10th

The Morning Run is a compilation of links, news and commentary.

We posted our latest podcast yesterday. Topics include Ryan Hall running the Boston Marathon, the indoor television schedule, the fight at the Armory and Bev Kearney’s resignation.

Tuesday’s list of top moments of running-related violence neglected to mention Josephat Machuka punching Haile Gebrselassie in the head at the 1992 World Junior Championships. Thanks to reader Matthew B. for brining this to my attention.

An extreme race became too extreme for some participants in Washington and now there are lawsuits. This is just what Bill Bowerman dreamed of when he helped spark the running boom in the United States.

Construction begins Saturday on the first tartan track in Iten, Kenya. Iten is the home of Lornah Kiplagat, Wilson Kipketer, Mary Keitany, Linet Masai, David Rudisha….wait, they got this good without access to a professional track?

Galen Rupp and Matt Centrowitz will run the mile at Saturday’s University of Washington Indoor Preview.

Bernard Lagat, Lawi Lalang, Cam Levins, Evan Jager, Dathan Ritzenhein and German Fernandez are among the entrants for the Millrose Games two-mile on February 16th. Before we get too excited, remember that we will still be in the “I’m still just in my base phase” portion of the season.

Millrose also announced that Jason Richardson and Andrew Riley will race the 60-meter hurdles.

Marathoner Ryan Vail is the subject of a short documentary. He probably is the fastest marathoner/shoe store employee in the country.

Peter Vigneron discusses the role, or lack thereof, that marketability plays in elite athlete sponsorships.

The Bowerman released their men’s preseason watch list. I would put my money on someone who does more than one event. Three of the past four winners doubled and the fourth was named Ashton Eaton.

The Morning Run: January 8th

The Morning Run is a compilation of links, news and commentary.

-Ryan Hall will be racing the Boston Marathon this April.

-Boston’s New Balance Indoor Grand Prix added Galen Rupp, Jen Suhr, Dejen Gebremeskel and Hagos Gebrhiwet to their start lists.

-The fight during the boys 4 x 400 relay at the Hispanic Games on Saturday has once again put the issue of violence in running-related events in the spotlight.  Ok, not really.  Runners, jumpers and throwers are by and large a peaceful people and the incidents of them getting physical are remarkably rare.  I couldn’t even find enough good material to make a top five, so here are three notable track and field/cross country skirmishes:

*Note: The United States 4 x 100 relay team assaulting the baton after dropping it on numerous occasions, Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad pushing mascots, and Allyson Felix and Jenebah Tarmoh torturing our emotions were all not considered for this list.
 

In 2004, Florida State’s Antonio Cromartie, yes that Antonio Cromartie, pushed a Clemson runner off the track in the 400.  The gentleman from Clemson was not pleased.

In the 2011 World Cross Country Championships, Ethiopian and Eritrean runners “tussled” down the homestretch before awkwardly sprinting toward the finish line.

And finally, the gold standard.  Mehdi Baala and Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad fight exactly how would expect French distance runners to fight.

-While we are on the topic of violence, Edwin Rotich was tackled, or almost tackled, by a spectator in Brazil and still went on to win Kings Run in Sao Paulo.

-Nichole Porath, a 2012 US Olympic Trials finisher in the marathon, set a world record in the indoor marathon.  She ran 150 laps in 2:57:34 beating the old record by over 11 minutes.  Dizzying.

-No surprise, Veronica Campbell-Brown will not be racing indoors.

-Soon-to-be 2004 Olympic gold medalist Adam Nelson writes about structural changes that could improve track and field.

The Morning Run- April 14th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Rotterdam Marathon is on Sunday and the Boston Marathon is Monday.  Both races have huge implications for the Kenyan and Ethiopian Olympic teams and there is a world record attempt in the men’s race in Rotterdam.  On last week’s show, Jason and I made the following predictions:

Boston

Men:

Kevin: Geoffrey Mutai, Wilson Chebet, Wesley Korir

Jason: Geoffrey Mutai, Matthew Kisorio, Gebre Gebremariam

Women:

Kevin: Buzunesh Deba, Firehiwot Dado, Aselefech Mergia (she may be a scratch)

Jason: Firehiwot Dado, Caroline Kilel, Buzunesh Deba

Rotterdam

Men:

Kevin: Moses Mosop (2:03:50), Peter Kirui, Sammy Kitwara

Jason: Moses Mosop (WR, but not faster than 2:03:02), Sammy Kitwara, Peter Kirui

It is supposed to be very hot in Boston on race day.

The Boston Globe gives a sample week of Geoffrey Mutai’s training.  It is filled with running.

Here are some training videos and interviews with Peter Kirui and Moses Mosop during their preparations for the Rotterdam Marathon.  Dutch subtitles are available for all of our readers in the Netherlands.

For Sunday’s Vienna Half Marathon, Paula Radcliffe will have a 7:52 head start on Haile Gebrselassie.  The time was decided on their respective bests in the event, which I believe gives the edge to Radcliffe.

Saturday’s UTech Classic in Jamaica features Yohan Blake in the 100, Asafa Powell in the 200 and Blake, Powell and Usain Bolt in the 4 x 100.

SB Nation reporter, and friend of the House of Run, Dan Rubenstein interviews Sanya Richards-Ross in his quest to find his favorite Olympic sport.  Veterans of the House of Run will remember Dan as the person who correctly picked Firehiwot Dado to win last year’s New York City Marathon on our preview podcast last November.

Joe Battaglia asks 10 questions to Yelena Isinbayeva.  Unfortunately, Joe does not get a firm answer on what she says to her pole.

You know it is the heart of spring when there is uproar about a high school track athlete getting disqualified for jewelry.  At some point, high school officials and rule makers decided that the most important aspect of all of track and field to emphasize was uniform compliance.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 12th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our most recent podcast is here.  In it, Jason and I discuss the Stanford InvitationalFlorida Relays, the upcoming Boston and Rotterdam marathons and the trailer to the movie “Fast Girls.”

David Epstein of Sports Illustrated wrote a fantastic article on the late Sammy Wanjiru.  Epstein also appeared on the Sports Illustrated podcast.  I highly recommend both.

Philip Hersh reports that sprinter Marshevet Hooker is pregnant and will not compete at the Olympics.  Hooker was on the 2008 team and was 8th at last year’s World Championships.  Nick Zaccardi of Sports Illustrated points out that Hooker’s absence potentially makes room for collegians English Gardner and Octavious Freeman.  However, Hooker’s experience, and speed, will be missed on the 4 x 100 relay where the US is trying to beat the Jamaican squad for a second year in a row.  It was Hooker’s leg last year (3rd leg) that blew the race open and carried them to victory.

Australian pole vaulter Steve Hooker now trains in a “Bat Cave” and appears to be on the comeback after suffering from the “yips” in 2011.

A North Korean marathon exists…….and had a great finish……. and an interesting press release.  The winning time of 2:12:54 was well off King Jong Il’s 1:59:59 course record.

David Rudisha plans only three races before London.  Not sure if this includes the Kenyan Trials.

Lashawn Merritt wants to race NFL stars after his season is over.  I am sure there is a long line of NFL players just waiting to get exposed by Merritt in a 100.

The Kenyan 10,000 meter team, which will ultimately be decided in Eugene at the Prefontaine Classic, has cut the field down to 30.  Another 15 will be cut after a race in Kenya next week.

Guardian retrospective on the life and death of Florence Griffith-Joyner.

Yohan Blake and Asafa Powell are not racing this weekend, but will be at the same meet.  Who could have seen this coming?

Blake is planning to double in the 100 and 200 in London.  I will have more on this decision, and other key Olympic track and field decisions, on tomorrow’s Morning Run.

Science of Sport’s ”Around the Rings” column features 3 topics on running.

Pat Price reviews the documentary, “Town of Runners.”

After saying that she would be satisfied with a bronze, Paula Radcliffe now sees gold in marathon at London as “realistic.”  The British press have already begun salivating and frantically searching the internet for synonyms for “failure.”

The top American marks of the outdoor season thus far.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 6th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

For your listening pleasure, our most recent podcast featuring filmmaker Tim Jeffreys is up.

Here is the trailer for the film about Ryan Hall and information about helping the production.

Jesse Squire provides a great viewing guide for this weekend’s meets so you don’t have to comb through heat sheets or time schedules.

Ken Goe writes about Oregon 800 runner Elijah Greer, while Curtis Anderson wonders whether English Garder can break 11 seconds in the 100.

Washington Redskins defensive back Deangelo Hall reportedly bet Lashawn Merritt $100,000 that he could beat him in a 100 meter race in 2008.  Yes, betting an Olympic sprinter that you could run faster then him is the height of stupidity and hubris, but strangely this doesn’t even qualify as the worst financial decision made by a Washington pro athlete.

Track and Field News makes their early medal predictions for London. Ibrahim Jeylan, Justin Gatlin and Sanya Richards-Ross seem ranked a bit high, while Jason Richardson, Jenny Simpson and Geoffrey Mutai are not picked to medal.

Speaking of Mutai, he says that winning is his focus in the Boston Marathon, not time.  Co-host Jason said this week that if Mutai does not get selected for the Kenyan marathon team it would be a travesty.  I agree, he could run 2:10 in Boston and I would still pick him.

Paula Radcliffe chimes in on the “plastic Brit” debate.

Scientists analyze ways Usain Bolt could lower his time in the 100 to 9.45.  All it will take is a perfect race in perfect conditions.

Kevin

Episode 14: Running Potpourri

Jason and Kevin discuss the latest marathon results, the high school cross country national championships and look ahead to some exciting match-ups on the track.

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