Tag Archives: carmelita jeter

The Morning Run: January 28th

-Remember at the end of Without Limits when it says that at the time of Steve Prefontaine’s death, he held every American record between 2,000 and 10,000 meters? After running 3:50.92 for the mile indoors on Saturday, Galen Rupp is reaching that level of American dominance.

-Mary Cain continues her record book reconstruction tour and easily takes down the high school mile record at the New Balance Games.

-In Glasgow, Duane Solomon set the American record in the 600, Bernard Lagat won the 3,000 and an unknown defeated Carmelita Jeter in the 60.  You can find all of the videos here.  In the team competition, Russia and the United States tied with 58 points. Run-off or coin flip?  Neither?  Boo.

-Mo Farah will run the New Orleans Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon in February.  Sure he beat the Bekele brothers, but how will he fare against 9 guys racing in Mardi Gras costumes? 

-First, Dayron Robles was sitting out 2013.  Then, he was retiring.  Now it sounds like he may just be doing some sort of NBA/NFL style holdout and plans on returning in 2014 for a new country. If Cuba is looking for a trade, it is definitely a buyer’s market for hurdlers right now.

-Jesse Squire highlights two overlooked performances of the weekend, Lawi Lalang in the 3,000 and Cas Loxsom in the 600, in his Weekly College Awards. 

The Morning Run: January 24th

Because this picture is awesome (via @atoboldon

-Track and Field News reports that Wallace Spearmon will move up to the 400 this summer.  Spearmon said previously that he was going to run the 200 and the 400 in 2013.  If he completely abandons the 200, Americans will have a huge hole to fill.  Spearmon was the only Olympic finalist in London and 100-meter stars Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and Ryan Bailey don’t appear to be keen on attempting the double this season.  Add in the questionable health of Walter Dix, and the Jamaican dominance in the 200 looks to be even more pronounced in the near future.    

Spearmon’s 400 potential is an interesting question.  His best time dates back to 2006, where he ran 45.22.  The 400 is not nearly as deep as the other sprints, but at age 28 Spearmon will be at the older end of the spectrum in an event that is currently dominated by a 20-year-old.  If nothing else, Spearmon could provide some help in the 4 x 400 where the Americans were upset by the Bahamas in London.

-Usain Bolt will run in the Oslo Diamond League meet on June 13th. I’m very grateful for the head’s up, but wouldn’t it be better if we could get the start lists for the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix first before we look to a meet that is more than 5 months away.

-The Tokyo Marathon will feature 2:04 tempo runner and the world’s most overqualified second place finisher, Dennis Kimetto 

-Jim McDannald continues to work the Pac-12 broadcast beat.

-Ken Goe’s links also include an update on the Pac-12’s policy and what it means for the indoor meets in Seattle this winter.

-The Turbaned Tornado will retire from racing after the Hong Kong Marathon on February 24th.

-This weekend’s action: Galen Rupp racing a mile in BostonBernard LagatCarmelita Jeter and several other A-Listers in Glasgow.

-Yohan Blake has a new, expensive watch that he will be wearing this season.

What it has:

-Asymmetrical case

-Handwound tourbillon movement

-“Beast bridges”

What it doesn’t have:

-GPS

-100-lap memory

-Airtight/bulletproof protective case, which would seem to be necessary for a $620,000 watch being worn during an athletic competition.

-Our podcast from Wednesday where Jason was in “studio” with me.

The Morning Run: August 21st

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

We have reached the “two degrees of Usain Bolt” portion of the season.  All Bolt all the time.  Minor league baseball player Billy Hamilton is the latest non-track runner who thinks he can beat Bolt in a race.  Get it line Billy, Usain will get to you right after he takes care of Denard Robinson, Chris Johnson and whoever else decides that they are somehow faster than the fastest man in the world.  Ever.

More Bolt, gold medalist Greg Rutherford said he would not be intimidated if Bolt took a shot at Rutherford’s specialty, the long jump.  Agree that Bolt’s switch to the long jump wouldn’t be as easy as most assume.  Disagree that Rutherford wouldn’t be intimidated if Bolt somehow found his way to the long jump runway.

Yesterday in Budapest, Sanya Richards-Ross won the 200, Jason Richardson took 110 hurdles and Christian Taylor got the win in the triple jump.

In Linz, Austria the big winners were Kirani James, Felix Sanchez, Charonda Williams, Ginnie Crawford, Hannah England and Nickel Ashmeade.

Want to relive the action from London 2012?  NBC Olympics has all the events archived here.

There are Diamond League meets this week in Lausanne and Birmingham.  Thursday is Lausanne and Birmingham is on Sunday.  The Lausanne meet has many Olympic champions and several high quality fields.

Bolt headlines the meet in the men’s 200 which also includes bronze medalist Warren Weir, Wallace Spearmon and Jason Young.

In the women’s 100, all of the London medalists will be on the start line.  Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Carmelita Jeter and Veronica Campbell-Brown.  The men’s 100 features four of the eight Olympic finalists: Tyson Gay, Ryan Bailey, Richard Thompson and Yohan Blake.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 9th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our podcast from yesterday, which started as a recap of the results from Kingston, but ended as a referendum on the movie Without Limits, is up.

The IOC will retest doping samples from the 2004 Olympics.

The Guardian speculates about a potential match-up between David Rudisha and Usain Bolt in the 4 x 400 at the Olympics.  Throw in Oscar PistoriusLashawn Merritt and Dai Greene and we would have something akin to a running apocalypse.   Also, you have to love Rudisha’s epic understatement, “Bolt is fast, he has speed, that I don’t have.”

Bolt says he needs to run fast and win in London.  Not sure why this still qualifies as news.

Joe Battaglia profiles Julius Yego, the Kenyan javelin thrower.

Carmelita Jeter, Yohan Blake and Novelene Williams-Mills will all be running at today’s Cayman Invitational.

The preliminary start lists for the Oxy High Performance meet are out.  The mid-distance races are filled with big names.

Does Asafa Powell get a fair shake in Jamaica?  I vote yes, almost too fair.

Jesse Squire names another member of his Dual Meet Hall of Fame.

Ken Goe’s Tuesday links.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 7th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Jamaica Invitational headlines this edition of the Morning Run.  Despite running woefully behind schedule (so much so that the satellite window closed before the men’s and women’s 200m races) the meet featured several gold medal favorites and the deepest sprint fields thus far in 2012.

Usain Bolt had his fastest debut ever in the 100 with a 9.82 win.  Michael Frater and Lerone Clarke pushed him, but Bolt, and the jersey featuring his face, was too much over the last 30 meters.

Sanya Richards-Ross lost her race, and her world lead, to Novelene Williams-Mills in the 400.

Carmelita Jeter didn’t look at the top of her game, but she still ran a world-leading 10.81.

A bulked up Yohan Blake won the men’s 200 in 19.91.   Last year, it took Bolt a few months to look like his old self after putting on muscle in the off-season.

In a mild upset, Bianca Knight ran down Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce in the women’s 200.

The rest of the professional results, including Bershawn Jackson and Brigitte Foster Hylton, are here.

In Kawasaki, Allyson Felix won the 100 in 11.22, Liu Xiang went 13.09 in the 110 hurdles and Amantle Montsho ran 50.52 in the 400.

Andrew Wheating returned to racing at the Oregon Twilight and won in “epic Wheating fashion.”  Bridget Franek also starred with a world-lead in the steeplechase.

It was a two steps back weekend for Alan Webb at the Duke Twilight.

Jesse Squire’s first member of his dual meet hall of fame.

The New York Times on Ashton Eaton, his coach Harry Marra, and the potential of a US sweep in London.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 4th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

In light of Rich Perelman’s post about track and television yesterday, Ken Goe’s lead in to his morning links is particularly perceptive and spot-on.  As has been said many times before, the control and focus of the sport lies with the coaches and athletes, when it should be geared toward the fans.

Saturday’s Jamaica Invitational will be a great opportunity to see many Olympic favorites, including Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Sanya Richards-Ross and Carmelita Jeter.  The meet begins at 8 pm EST/5 pm PST and will be streamed live (for free) here.

Glen Mills, coach of Bolt and Blake, think the two can coexist and flourish in the same training group, despite the naysayers.

Sanya Richards-Ross relives the 4 x 400 from the Beijing Olympics.  Spoiler, the US still catches Russia on the homestretch.

Tim Layden analyzes the components of the 100-meter dash in this NPR feature.

Martin Bingisser provides 10 reasons why you should watch the hammer throw in 2012.  The 11th reason should be keeping tabs on Martin’s own quest for a fourth consecutive Swiss national championship, while being a full time tax attorney.

American distance runner Chris Solinsky will not compete in the Olympic Trials due to injury.  He seems upbeat, but four years is a really long time to wait.

Lashinda Demus tells USA Today about the Olympic Trials, having her mom as a coach, drug testers and more.

Joe Battaglia digs deeper into Patrick Makau’s exclusion from the Kenyan marathon team.

Polakoff Communications lists “5 Things Every Athlete Needs to Know Before London.”  Bring your own food, was not listed.

The Penn Relays enjoyed its best television ratings since 2003

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin