Tag Archives: david rudisha

The Morning Run: January 10th

The Morning Run is a compilation of links, news and commentary.

We posted our latest podcast yesterday. Topics include Ryan Hall running the Boston Marathon, the indoor television schedule, the fight at the Armory and Bev Kearney’s resignation.

Tuesday’s list of top moments of running-related violence neglected to mention Josephat Machuka punching Haile Gebrselassie in the head at the 1992 World Junior Championships. Thanks to reader Matthew B. for brining this to my attention.

An extreme race became too extreme for some participants in Washington and now there are lawsuits. This is just what Bill Bowerman dreamed of when he helped spark the running boom in the United States.

Construction begins Saturday on the first tartan track in Iten, Kenya. Iten is the home of Lornah Kiplagat, Wilson Kipketer, Mary Keitany, Linet Masai, David Rudisha….wait, they got this good without access to a professional track?

Galen Rupp and Matt Centrowitz will run the mile at Saturday’s University of Washington Indoor Preview.

Bernard Lagat, Lawi Lalang, Cam Levins, Evan Jager, Dathan Ritzenhein and German Fernandez are among the entrants for the Millrose Games two-mile on February 16th. Before we get too excited, remember that we will still be in the “I’m still just in my base phase” portion of the season.

Millrose also announced that Jason Richardson and Andrew Riley will race the 60-meter hurdles.

Marathoner Ryan Vail is the subject of a short documentary. He probably is the fastest marathoner/shoe store employee in the country.

Peter Vigneron discusses the role, or lack thereof, that marketability plays in elite athlete sponsorships.

The Bowerman released their men’s preseason watch list. I would put my money on someone who does more than one event. Three of the past four winners doubled and the fourth was named Ashton Eaton.

The Morning Run: July 12th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Jason and I posted our weekly podcast yesterday.  We cover Usain Bolt’s injury, Tarmohgeddon, David Rudisha, the guy who thinks he can break two hours in the marathon and much more.

Tomorrow, the two-day London Diamond League meet begins.  Start lists are posted here.

18-year-old British sprinter Adam Gemili won the 100 at the World Junior Championships in 10.05.  He will compete for the host country in the Olympics. Jacko Gill also won.

The IAAF announced that Oscar Pistorius can run any leg of the 4 x 400 relay.  Last year, he was required to run first to “avoid danger to other athletes.”  This keeps my dream anchor leg situation intact with Pistorius vs. Bolt vs. Rudisha vs. Merritt vs. Greene.  The chances this actually happens, not good.  But…..

Gregg Doyel of CBS Sports, who has the most menacing byline photo on the internet, writes that Pistorius should not be allowed to run in the Olympics.

trailer has been released from the upcoming documentary, Usain Bolt: The Fastest Man Alive.  You can see sprint coaches cringing when Bolt explains how he looks side-to-side at least twice in his typical race.

Two Canadian hurdlers who didn’t make the Olympic team ask questions of the selection process.  I wonder why.

Olympic Trials champion, and prolific neck chalker, Reese Hoffa discusses the Olympics, juggling and his height in a USA Today interview.  Check out our interview with Hoffa from December 2011.  It is a good one.

Want to stream the Olympics online?  Read this first.

Usain Bolt’s agent, Ricky Simms, will now represent Galen Rupp.  Michael Johnson was Rupp’s previous agent.

My Athletic Life lists the Twitter handles for the entire American team.  50k race walker John Nunn is not listed.  Come on, John!!

I’m sure it is no consolation prize for missing the Olympics, but Walter Dix won the ESPY for best track and field athlete last night.

-Kevin

The Morning Run: July 6th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

If you are nostalgic for the Olympic Trials, you can always relive the action by listening to the daily podcasts we posted:

Day 1 with Jim McDannald of Track Focus

Day 2 with Joe Battaglia of NBC Olympics

Day 3 with Ryan Fenton of Flotrack

Day 4 with co-host Jason

Day 5 with Ato Boldon of NBC

Day 7 with Tim Layden of Sports Illustrated

Day 8 with Joe Battaglia of NBC Olympics

The Diamond League meet in Paris is today.  In a few hours in fact.  The meet will be headlined by David Rudisha’s attempt at another world record in the 800.

South African officials named Oscar Pistorius to the Olympic team in the 400 and the 4 x 400 relay.  Previously, they stated he would need to run under 45.30 twice this season to be eligible to represent South Africa (he has run under that time once this season).  Not a huge deal as he has run under the “A” standard in 2012 and 2011, but the waffling by governing bodies this year has been difficult to keep track of.  South Africa, Kenya and Ethiopia should unite under an umbrella organization called Arbitrary Athletics.

Usain Bolt will not run in the Monaco Diamond League.  He was planning using the race as his final tune-up before London, but appears to be nursing an injury after losing twice to Yohan Blake at the Jamaican Olympic Trials last week.

Courtesy of @JasonC1975, Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad doing what he does.

Over at the Daily Mail in Great Britain, there is apparently not much to write about.

Flotrack features Ryan Hall.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- June 11th SPEED Rankings

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

A few links before the updated SPEED Rankings:

Usain Bolt was involved in a car accident in Kingston on Sunday.  There were no injuries reported.

Yesterday in Vancouver, Andrew Wheating won the 1500 in 3:35.89, while Matt Centrowitz finishsed fourth in 3:37.22.

A final look back at the NCAA Championships from Jesse Squire.

Andrew Riley’s historic 100/110 hurdles double was the highlight of the meet, but what does his future hold?

On the Guardian’s US sports blog, I wrote about Tyson Gay’s first race in almost a year.

Joe Battaglia writes about the David Rudisha’s jaw dropper and whether drawing a more favorable lane can lead Oscar Pistorius to London.

Now for the rankings…..

The track and field world goes relatively dark for the next couple of week.   These will be the last rankings until July 2nd- when the “trials” season is over.  Remember, the rankings are subjective and completely unscientific.

Men

100

1)    Usain Bolt

2)   Yohan Blake

3)   Justin Gatlin

4)   Asafa Powell

5)   Tyson Gay

In just one race (and a B race at that) Gay has put himself back on the map.  I don’t see any signs yet that Bolt is beatable this year, but Gay is in the thick of the silver medal discussion.  His 10.00 on Saturday was actually faster than Blake’s 9.90 when adjusted for wind.

200

1)   Usain Bolt

2)   Yohan Blake

3)   Wallace Spearmon

4)   Churandy Martina

5)   Nickel Ashmeade

Ashmeade and Martina both went under 20 seconds in New York.  As was the case in 2011, this event is starting slowly.

400

1)   Lashawn Merritt

2)   Kirani James

3)   Luguelin Santos

4)   Tony McQuay

5)   Mike Berry

Santos won in New York, but McQuay had the best weekend.  He posted two of the top four times this year at the NCAA Championships in Des Moines.  Also, he anchored Florida to the win in the 4 x 400 in a low 44 split.

800

1)   David Rudisha

2)   Abubaker Kaki

3)   Mohammed Aman

4)   Leonard Kosencha

5)   Nick Symmonds

Rudisha put significant space between himself and the rest of the world in New York.  His time of 1:41.74 was .73 off the world record and was enough to win the race by a preposterous margin- almost 3 seconds.

1500

1)   Asbel Kiprop

2)   Nixon Chepseba

3)   Ayanleh Souleiman

4)   Silas Kiplagat

5)   Caleb Ndiku

Kiprop ran a world leading time in the mile of 3:49.22 at the Bislett Games and held the lead from far out.  Ndiku, who posted good results indoors, was 2nd.  Bernard Lagat beat Ayanleh Souleiman in New York, but since Lagat doesn’t plan on racing much at 1500 I left him off.

5000

1)   Mo Farah

2)   Bernard Lagat

3)   Isiah Koech

4)   Galen Rupp

5)   Dejen Gebremeskel

The race in Oslo had a heavy Ethiopian presence and three men were able to go under 13 minutes.  Gebremeskel was first in 12:58.92 and will get the rotating 5th spot this week.  Kenenisa Bekele ran a season’s best, but was only 5th.

10000

1)   Mo Farah

2)   Kenenisa Bekele

3)   Tariku Bekele

4)   Wilson Kiprop

5)   Moses Masai

No reason to change anything here.  You could make an argument that Bekele should drop by virtue of is 5,000 showings, but I think at this point in his career he will fare much better at 10,000.

110 Hurdles

1)  Liu Xiang

2)   Dayron Robles

3)   Aries Merritt

4)   Jason Richardson

5)   David Oliver

It was a false start party in New York.  After the fourth attempt, Richardson won the race.  By that time, Merritt had been disqualified and everyone else looked completely out of sync.

 400 Hurdles

1)  Javier Culson

2)   Angelo Taylor

3)   Bershawn Jackson

4)   Jehue Gordon

5)   Jeshua Anderson

Culson won again in Oslo and has the three fastest times in the world this year.  Gordon was 2nd and now makes his SPEED Rankings debut.

3000 Steeplechase

1)   Paul Koech

2)   Richard Mateelong

3)   Abel Mutai

4)   Ezekiel Kemboi

5)   Roba Gari

No steeples this week=no changes.

Women

100

1)   Carmelita Jeter

2)   Veronica Campbell-Brown

3)   Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

4)   Tianna Madison

5)    Murielle Ahoure

Much more movement with this event than I anticipated. Fraser-Pryce won in New York ahead of Madison, Jeter and Allyson Felix.  Is this the last we see of Felix in this event in 2012?  What do we make of Jeter?  After a great start in Kingston, two sub-par races in the United States.  Last year she timed her peak perfectly, so she gets the benefit of the doubt for now.

200

1)   Veronica Campbell-Brown

2)   Allyson Felix

3)   Jeneba Tarmoh

4)   Kimberlyn Duncan

5)   Sanya Richards-Ross

Richards-Ross ran the fastest time in the world on Saturday, unfortunately the cameras stopped rolling at that point for American viewers.  As expected, Duncan easily won the NCAA 200.

400

1)   Sanya Richards-Ross

2)   Allyson Felix

3)   Amantle Montsho

4)   Francena McCorory

5)   Novelene Williams-Mills

Montsho had an easy win in Oslo and McCorory just edged Williams-Mills in New York.  How sharp is Richards-Ross right now?  See above.

800

1)   Fantu Magiso

2)   Pamela Jelimo

3)   Alysia Johnson

4)   Janeth Jepkosgei

5)   Mariya Savinova

Magiso won in routine fashion in New York.  None of the others in the top five raced.

1500

1)   Abeba Aregawi

2)   Genzebe Dibaba

3)   Hellen Obiri

4)   Btissam Lakhouad

5)   Morgan Uceny

Aregawi won again, so I did her the honor of actually spelling her name correctly this week.  Dibaba was a closer second in Rome.  Another steady performance for Uceny with a 4:05 for sixth.

5000

1)   Vivian Cheruiyot

2)   Tirunesh Dibaba

3)   Meseret Defar

4)   Sally Kipyego

5)   Viola Kibiwot

The baby-faced destroyer keeps inching closer back to her destroying form of old.  She won in New York over Defar with a punishing last two laps to finish in 14:50.

10000

1)   Vivian Cheruiyot

2)   Tirunesh Dibaba

3)   Meseret Defar

4)   Sally Kipyego

5)   Florence Kiplagat

No changes.  Very interested to see how the Kenyan trials shake out in Nairobi.

100 Hurdles

1) Sally Pearson

2)   Dawn Harper

3)   Kellie Wells

4)   Brigitte Foster-Hylton

5)   Kristi Castlin

Pearson was brilliant in Oslo with a world-leading 12.49.  Castlin made it closer than expected running a lifetime best of 12.56.  The American trials in this event will be fun to watch.

400 Hurdles

1) Kaliese Spencer

2)   Lashinda Demus

3)   Vania Stambolova

4)   Irina Davydova

5)   Ti’erra Brown

This event has been all over the place in 2012.  Brown upset Spencer in New York.  The week prior Spencer looked very good beating Demus in Rome.

3000 Steeplechase

1)  Milcah Chemos

2)   Yuliya Zaripova

3)   Habiba Ghribi

4)   Sofia Assefa

5)   Hiwot Ayalew

Chemos won again and broke all sorts of records in the process.  Her time of 9:07.14 was the fifth fastest ever.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 9th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our podcast from yesterday, which started as a recap of the results from Kingston, but ended as a referendum on the movie Without Limits, is up.

The IOC will retest doping samples from the 2004 Olympics.

The Guardian speculates about a potential match-up between David Rudisha and Usain Bolt in the 4 x 400 at the Olympics.  Throw in Oscar PistoriusLashawn Merritt and Dai Greene and we would have something akin to a running apocalypse.   Also, you have to love Rudisha’s epic understatement, “Bolt is fast, he has speed, that I don’t have.”

Bolt says he needs to run fast and win in London.  Not sure why this still qualifies as news.

Joe Battaglia profiles Julius Yego, the Kenyan javelin thrower.

Carmelita Jeter, Yohan Blake and Novelene Williams-Mills will all be running at today’s Cayman Invitational.

The preliminary start lists for the Oxy High Performance meet are out.  The mid-distance races are filled with big names.

Does Asafa Powell get a fair shake in Jamaica?  I vote yes, almost too fair.

Jesse Squire names another member of his Dual Meet Hall of Fame.

Ken Goe’s Tuesday links.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 8th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Toni Reavis wants stadiums to turn off the Jumbotron.  Sometimes.

How much do track and field athletes make?  Jack Wickens tried to find out.

Preliminary start lists for the Doha Diamond League were released this morning for both men and women.  Most anticipation match-ups: David Rudisha vs. Mohammed Aman in the 800.  Shelly Ann Fraser vs. Veronica Campbell-Brown in the 100.  Kellie Wells vs. Brigitte Foster-Hylton in the 100 hurdles.  Silas Kiplagat vs. Asbel Kiprop vs. Nixon Chepseba vs. Abubaker Kaki in the 1500. Imane Merga’s elbows vs. the field in the 3,000.

Dick Fosbury’s flop, and gold medal, make the Guardian’s50 stunning Olympic Moments.”

Jeremy Wariner now considers himself under the radar in a 400 field that includes Kirani James and Lashawn Merritt.

Joe Battaglia succinctly recaps the weekend in track and field and road racing.

Dwain Chambers apologizes for at least the 300th time.

In a cool feature for the Independent, Ben Salmon goes through the same paces that track athletes will experience at the Olympic stadium.

Jesse Squire inducts Hayward Field into his Dual Meet Hall of Fame.  Finally, Hayward gets some recognition.

Pat Price asks Bridget Franek five questions.

In the most Scottish news of the day, a man in Chicago ran a half-marathon in a kilt.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 21

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Plenty of action this weekend on and off the track.  The London Marathon is on Sunday and, as Nick Zaccardi of Sports Illustrated points out, many of the world’s top track runners will also be in action.

First to the marathon.  The full elite men’s and women’s fields courtesy of Athletics Weekly.

Predictions from this week’s podcast.

Kevin:

Men: Vincent Kipruto, Emmanuel Mutai, Tsegay Kebede

Women: Mary Keitany, Florence Kiplagat, Ejegayehu Dibaba

Jason:

Men: Emmanuel Mutai, Tsegay Kebede, Patrick Makau

Women: Mary Keitany, Edna Kiplagat, Aberu Kebede

I stuck with the chaos theory theme of this year’s marathon season and chose Vincent Kipruto to upset all four of the Kenyans still in Olympic consideration.  Even with a win, Athletics Kenyan is still likely to choose from the original six of Geoffrey Mutai, Emmaneul Mutai, Moses Mosop, Wilson Kipsang, Abel Kirui and Patrick Makau.   Here is what needs to happen for each to qualify:

Geoffrey Mutai: Since his DNF in Boston, all Mutai can do is wait and watch on Sunday.  His phenomenal 2011 should count for something, so he is probably safe unless 3 or more Kenyans dip under the 2:04:30 mark in London.

Moses Mosop: Like Geoffrey Mutai, Mosop has already raced his spring marathon (3rd place in Rotterdam) so his Olympic hopes rest on the performances in London.  However, Mosop needs much more help than G. Mutai.  Some modest times combined with upsets (Lel or Kipruto being the top Kenyan for example) are his only path to the top three.

Emmanuel Mutai: The defending London Marathon champion benefitted from Geoffrey Mutai’s and Moses Mosop’s losses, but most likely he still needs to finish in the top three and beat at least two of the three top Kenyans racing (Makau, Kirui, Kipsang).  He may also be able to squeak in with a lower place, if the times are very fast (under 2:04) and he finishes well amongst his countrymen.

Patrick Makau:  Like Mutai, I think he can only lose to one Kenyan on Sunday and still be in a good position for selection.  Despite holding the world record, his Berlin performance came in a paced race against a weaker than expected field.  He has wins over Geoffrey Mutai from 2010, but I doubt those carry much weight now.  As it stands, he is ahead of Kipsang and Kirui, so a loss on Sunday to either of those two, would probably mean he is off the team.

Abel Kirui:  Based on time, Kirui is least credentialed of the six.  He has won two world championship titles, which is the only reason he is still in consideration for a berth.  I think he needs a top 3 overall performance as well as the second Kenyan to have any hope of jumping over the others.

Wilson Kipsang:  No major marathon wins and no wins against the other five in consideration make Kipsang a darkhorse  to make the team.  He was just seconds off the world record in Frankfurt, but, like Makau, it was done in a paced race.  It is hard to envision him getting the nod over Makau, or either of the Mutais unless he has a decisive victory and runs under 2:04 again.

The rest of the Morning Run:

Caster Semenya qualified for the Olympics, surprising nobody except for the editors at Fox.

Cam Levins beat Lawi Lalang in the 5,000 at Mt. SAC last night and earned the Olympic “A” standard in the process.

Kenyan 800 meter stars David Rudisha and Pamela Jelimo recorded wins in the 400.

Friday’s Oregon Relays action featured a fast 1500 by Sally Kipyego.

Ken Goe’s Saturday links.

LA Times feature on Brittney Reese titled “Brittney Reese hopes to be leaps and bounds above the rest.”  Because she is a long jumper.

Headline writers, yearbook editors and any others in charge of “punny” titles to articles.  Please avoid the following:

-“___________ raises the bar” (high jump/pole vault)

-“___________ clears hurdles/obstacles on/off the track” (hurdles)

-“____________ is on the fast track” (sprints)

-“_____________ goes the distance” (distance)

Enjoy your London Marathon, Mt. SAC Relays, Kansas Relays, Oregon Relays, Tom Jones Meet weekend!

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 12th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our most recent podcast is here.  In it, Jason and I discuss the Stanford InvitationalFlorida Relays, the upcoming Boston and Rotterdam marathons and the trailer to the movie “Fast Girls.”

David Epstein of Sports Illustrated wrote a fantastic article on the late Sammy Wanjiru.  Epstein also appeared on the Sports Illustrated podcast.  I highly recommend both.

Philip Hersh reports that sprinter Marshevet Hooker is pregnant and will not compete at the Olympics.  Hooker was on the 2008 team and was 8th at last year’s World Championships.  Nick Zaccardi of Sports Illustrated points out that Hooker’s absence potentially makes room for collegians English Gardner and Octavious Freeman.  However, Hooker’s experience, and speed, will be missed on the 4 x 100 relay where the US is trying to beat the Jamaican squad for a second year in a row.  It was Hooker’s leg last year (3rd leg) that blew the race open and carried them to victory.

Australian pole vaulter Steve Hooker now trains in a “Bat Cave” and appears to be on the comeback after suffering from the “yips” in 2011.

A North Korean marathon exists…….and had a great finish……. and an interesting press release.  The winning time of 2:12:54 was well off King Jong Il’s 1:59:59 course record.

David Rudisha plans only three races before London.  Not sure if this includes the Kenyan Trials.

Lashawn Merritt wants to race NFL stars after his season is over.  I am sure there is a long line of NFL players just waiting to get exposed by Merritt in a 100.

The Kenyan 10,000 meter team, which will ultimately be decided in Eugene at the Prefontaine Classic, has cut the field down to 30.  Another 15 will be cut after a race in Kenya next week.

Guardian retrospective on the life and death of Florence Griffith-Joyner.

Yohan Blake and Asafa Powell are not racing this weekend, but will be at the same meet.  Who could have seen this coming?

Blake is planning to double in the 100 and 200 in London.  I will have more on this decision, and other key Olympic track and field decisions, on tomorrow’s Morning Run.

Science of Sport’s ”Around the Rings” column features 3 topics on running.

Pat Price reviews the documentary, “Town of Runners.”

After saying that she would be satisfied with a bronze, Paula Radcliffe now sees gold in marathon at London as “realistic.”  The British press have already begun salivating and frantically searching the internet for synonyms for “failure.”

The top American marks of the outdoor season thus far.

-Kevin

 

Episode 14: Running Potpourri

Jason and Kevin discuss the latest marathon results, the high school cross country national championships and look ahead to some exciting match-ups on the track.

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