Tag Archives: haile gebrselassie

The Morning Run: January 10th

The Morning Run is a compilation of links, news and commentary.

We posted our latest podcast yesterday. Topics include Ryan Hall running the Boston Marathon, the indoor television schedule, the fight at the Armory and Bev Kearney’s resignation.

Tuesday’s list of top moments of running-related violence neglected to mention Josephat Machuka punching Haile Gebrselassie in the head at the 1992 World Junior Championships. Thanks to reader Matthew B. for brining this to my attention.

An extreme race became too extreme for some participants in Washington and now there are lawsuits. This is just what Bill Bowerman dreamed of when he helped spark the running boom in the United States.

Construction begins Saturday on the first tartan track in Iten, Kenya. Iten is the home of Lornah Kiplagat, Wilson Kipketer, Mary Keitany, Linet Masai, David Rudisha….wait, they got this good without access to a professional track?

Galen Rupp and Matt Centrowitz will run the mile at Saturday’s University of Washington Indoor Preview.

Bernard Lagat, Lawi Lalang, Cam Levins, Evan Jager, Dathan Ritzenhein and German Fernandez are among the entrants for the Millrose Games two-mile on February 16th. Before we get too excited, remember that we will still be in the “I’m still just in my base phase” portion of the season.

Millrose also announced that Jason Richardson and Andrew Riley will race the 60-meter hurdles.

Marathoner Ryan Vail is the subject of a short documentary. He probably is the fastest marathoner/shoe store employee in the country.

Peter Vigneron discusses the role, or lack thereof, that marketability plays in elite athlete sponsorships.

The Bowerman released their men’s preseason watch list. I would put my money on someone who does more than one event. Three of the past four winners doubled and the fourth was named Ashton Eaton.

The Morning Run: September 6th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

-The start lists for the final Diamond League meet in Brussels are posted.  We promise this is the last track meet of the year.  Ok, there is Rieti is on the 9th, but that is it.

-Hubert Lawrence of the Jamaica Gleaner argues that countries that have earned multiple wild cards to the World Championships should not be limited to four entries.  This situation arises when the Diamond League champion and the defending world champion come from the same country (but aren’t the same person).  Lawrence cites the men’s steeplechase where Ezekiel Kemboi is the defending champion and Paul Koech will win this season’s Diamond League.  This could happen (or already has happened) in at least four different events:

Men’s 100 (Usain Bolt/Yohan Blake)

Men’s 200 (Nickel Ashmeade/Bolt)

Men’s 110 Hurdles (Aries Merritt/Jason Richardson)

Women’s 5000 (Mercy Cherono, Vivian Cheruiyot) 

The U.S. won’t be in this position in the women’s 200, but it is interesting that American Charonda Williams is on the brink of winning the Diamond League title in the 200.  She can clinch with a first or second place finish or if Bianca Knight finishes lower than first.  Williams didn’t make the finals at the U.S. Olympic Trials and her results this year from the Diamond League show that consistency, not dominance, can win you the title:

Shanghai: 5th

Oslo: 3rd

Paris: 3rd

London: 1st

Stockholm: 1st

Brussels: ??

Most American sprint fans probably aren’t familiar with Williams, but credit to her for making the most of the new wild card rule.   She capitalized on the absence of the big 200-meter stars and now looks poised to earn a trip to Moscow.  Perhaps others were not aware of this alternate route to the World Championships (this was the case with hurdler Dawn Harper) , but surely fewer will be in the dark next season.

-Jason and I tried to make sense of David Rudisha’s defeat, Oscar Pistorius’ comments and Paul Ryan’s marathon time in our latest podcast.  As always, you can subscribe/rate the podcast on iTunes.

-Days after the controversial post-race accusations by Pistorius, the South African Paralympic Committee has registered a formal complaint with the International Paralympic Committee.  That should calm things down.

-Olympians Amy Hastings, Janet Cherobon-Bawcom and Julie Culley will run the New York City Marathon in November.

-Haile Gebrselassie and Mo Farah were slated to race in the half-marathon at the Bupa Great North Run next weekend.  That was until Gebrselassie dropped out with an injury and Farah opted to run the two-mile instead.  Welcome to the imminent disappointment that is the off-season.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 14th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Rotterdam Marathon is on Sunday and the Boston Marathon is Monday.  Both races have huge implications for the Kenyan and Ethiopian Olympic teams and there is a world record attempt in the men’s race in Rotterdam.  On last week’s show, Jason and I made the following predictions:

Boston

Men:

Kevin: Geoffrey Mutai, Wilson Chebet, Wesley Korir

Jason: Geoffrey Mutai, Matthew Kisorio, Gebre Gebremariam

Women:

Kevin: Buzunesh Deba, Firehiwot Dado, Aselefech Mergia (she may be a scratch)

Jason: Firehiwot Dado, Caroline Kilel, Buzunesh Deba

Rotterdam

Men:

Kevin: Moses Mosop (2:03:50), Peter Kirui, Sammy Kitwara

Jason: Moses Mosop (WR, but not faster than 2:03:02), Sammy Kitwara, Peter Kirui

It is supposed to be very hot in Boston on race day.

The Boston Globe gives a sample week of Geoffrey Mutai’s training.  It is filled with running.

Here are some training videos and interviews with Peter Kirui and Moses Mosop during their preparations for the Rotterdam Marathon.  Dutch subtitles are available for all of our readers in the Netherlands.

For Sunday’s Vienna Half Marathon, Paula Radcliffe will have a 7:52 head start on Haile Gebrselassie.  The time was decided on their respective bests in the event, which I believe gives the edge to Radcliffe.

Saturday’s UTech Classic in Jamaica features Yohan Blake in the 100, Asafa Powell in the 200 and Blake, Powell and Usain Bolt in the 4 x 100.

SB Nation reporter, and friend of the House of Run, Dan Rubenstein interviews Sanya Richards-Ross in his quest to find his favorite Olympic sport.  Veterans of the House of Run will remember Dan as the person who correctly picked Firehiwot Dado to win last year’s New York City Marathon on our preview podcast last November.

Joe Battaglia asks 10 questions to Yelena Isinbayeva.  Unfortunately, Joe does not get a firm answer on what she says to her pole.

You know it is the heart of spring when there is uproar about a high school track athlete getting disqualified for jewelry.  At some point, high school officials and rule makers decided that the most important aspect of all of track and field to emphasize was uniform compliance.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 10th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, Amby Burfoot of Runner’s World suggested changing the qualification procedure for the marathon in the Olympics.  Rather than base it on the three-per-nation limit, Burfoot wants a system where the best marathoners, regardless of nationality, all compete.  His full proposal is here, but the result for 2012 would be a field of seventeen Kenyans, two Ethiopians and one American.  By now, we are all well versed in the Kenyan and Ethiopian dominance of the event and how the Kenyan team this year will have to leave off several sub 2:06 performers.

Does the fact that the Olympics won’t have the deepest and best marathon in the world bother me?  Not entirely, because the Olympics aim to be about the participation of nations, rather than the greatest congregation of talent.  However, the real issue I have with Burfoot’s idea is that it doesn’t expand the field enough.

The tweak I would make to the race would allow Kenya (and other power countries) more entries than they hold currently, preserve the current state of the race and add a team component.  Here’s how it would work:

-Nation’s enter as five member teams.  This allows for two extra entries than the current system.  Does this mean there will still be deserving Kenyans and Ethiopians that will be left home? Certainly, but it is better to apologize to the 6th best than the 4th.

-In order to qualify as a team, at least 3 from your country must have met the “A” standard.  When looking at the numbers (keep in mind I did this just looking at 2011 times and for just the men’s field), only nine teams would qualify if all five members had to meet the “A” standard (Kenyan, Ethiopia, USA, Eritrea, Morocco, Japan, Russia, Poland, France), but if I opened it up to only three needing the standard, then nine more nations became eligible.  In these nations they often had several entrants that were just off the 2:15 “A” standard, so I didn’t feel that they overall competitiveness would be impacted by the presence of their 4th and 5th team members.

-Individuals from non-qualifying nations can still qualify by meeting the “A” standard.

-The team competition would be scored just like a cross country meet, except only the first four would count.  Medals would be distributed for the team competition as well as the individuals .

Obviously, there are many minor changes that could be made depending on the number of qualifiers and how many make the “A” standard on a given year.  If 18 teams made it, that would mean 90 runners would be a part of the team competition and it would still leave plenty of room for deserving individuals to represent their country.  The drama would extend from the front of the pack all the way to the back, and the US might even have a chance to snag a bronze every now and then.

The rest of The Morning Run…….

In The Sun’s article about Christine Ohuruogu, Allyson Felix says she is training for a double and is even considering racing the 100 instead of the 400, in addition to her favored 200.  She was .03 from a gold last summer in Daegu in the 400 and has never been a factor in the 100, so I’m a bit doubtful that she opts for the 100.

Ken Goe’s links.

Jesse Squire delivers his college awards from the past weekend.

Comedian Eddie Izzard runs with Haile Gebrselassie and discovers that Gebreselassie, and Ethiopia, are a bit confused by barefoot running.

Revealing Q and A with Usain Bolt where you discover that his training is in fact going well and that he wants to defend his Olympic titles in London.

More Bolt, he is scheduled to race a leg of the 4 x 100 this weekend at the UTech ClassicYohan Blake will run the 100 as well.

British marathoner Paula Radcliffe says she would be happy with a bronze at the Olympics.  That should take some pressure off.

Lolo Jones may not race in her home state at next weekend’s Drake Relays.

-Kevin