Tag Archives: ken goe

The Morning Run: January 24th

Because this picture is awesome (via @atoboldon

-Track and Field News reports that Wallace Spearmon will move up to the 400 this summer.  Spearmon said previously that he was going to run the 200 and the 400 in 2013.  If he completely abandons the 200, Americans will have a huge hole to fill.  Spearmon was the only Olympic finalist in London and 100-meter stars Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay and Ryan Bailey don’t appear to be keen on attempting the double this season.  Add in the questionable health of Walter Dix, and the Jamaican dominance in the 200 looks to be even more pronounced in the near future.    

Spearmon’s 400 potential is an interesting question.  His best time dates back to 2006, where he ran 45.22.  The 400 is not nearly as deep as the other sprints, but at age 28 Spearmon will be at the older end of the spectrum in an event that is currently dominated by a 20-year-old.  If nothing else, Spearmon could provide some help in the 4 x 400 where the Americans were upset by the Bahamas in London.

-Usain Bolt will run in the Oslo Diamond League meet on June 13th. I’m very grateful for the head’s up, but wouldn’t it be better if we could get the start lists for the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix first before we look to a meet that is more than 5 months away.

-The Tokyo Marathon will feature 2:04 tempo runner and the world’s most overqualified second place finisher, Dennis Kimetto 

-Jim McDannald continues to work the Pac-12 broadcast beat.

-Ken Goe’s links also include an update on the Pac-12’s policy and what it means for the indoor meets in Seattle this winter.

-The Turbaned Tornado will retire from racing after the Hong Kong Marathon on February 24th.

-This weekend’s action: Galen Rupp racing a mile in BostonBernard LagatCarmelita Jeter and several other A-Listers in Glasgow.

-Yohan Blake has a new, expensive watch that he will be wearing this season.

What it has:

-Asymmetrical case

-Handwound tourbillon movement

-“Beast bridges”

What it doesn’t have:

-GPS

-100-lap memory

-Airtight/bulletproof protective case, which would seem to be necessary for a $620,000 watch being worn during an athletic competition.

-Our podcast from Wednesday where Jason was in “studio” with me.

The Morning Run: January 18th

Because you can’t spend all your time reading about Manti Te’o….

-Jim McDannald of Track Focus reports that the Pac-12 is currently blocking Flotrack, Runnerspace and any other outside enterprise from streaming or archiving meets that are hosted by a Pac-12 school.  This decision gets even more puzzling when you consider that the Pac-12 may not even broadest these meets themselves.  This was the case at last Saturday’s University of Washington Indoor Preview.  Because of the large amount of college/professional meets that Pac-12 schools host, this policy would blackout fans from watching several marquee meets that have been previously available for viewing.

The development of propriety conference networks, and the huge amount of money that follows, is often cited as the savior of non-revenue sports.   It is interesting that these same networks could play a role in limiting the publicity of their schools and their athletes.

-Mo Farah will run one, and only one, indoor race this season.  Meanwhile, training partner Galen Rupp will race for the second time in 2013 at next Saturday’s BU Terrier Invite.

-Tirunesh Dibaba and Matt Centrowitz are the latest entries to the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix.

-Ken Goe’s Thursday links include a look at the relationship between Oregon’s football and track and field programs.

-Jesse Squire presents his College Notes.

-Our podcast from Wednesday where we discuss Mary Cain, the Boston Marathon field, Andy Murray’s acceleration and much more.

The Morning Run: January 15th

Because at least Lance Armstrong isn’t involved in track and field…. 

-Thanks to friend of the podcast Julian for notifying us that Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is running indoors for what appears to be the first time in her career.  She told the Jamaican Gleaner over the weekend that she will use the indoor season to prepare for outdoors and will presumably race the 60-meters.  Does this mean we might see a women’s sprint world record this winter?  Discounting relays, hurdles and oddball events like the 100-yard dash or the 150-meters, the most recent women’s sprint record is from February 9, 1995.   That year, Irina Privalova of Russia equaled her mark of 6.92 in the 60-meters from 1993.   By comparison, virtually every men’s record has been broken (and re-broken) during that same time period.

Could Fraser-Pryce break the 18-year drought?  Perhaps, if she gets enough chances.  Her start and drive phase are the strongest part of her race and she has already run, according to the awesome, but highly addictive alltime-athletics.com, 6.88 en route to her win in the 100-meters at the 2009 World Championships.

She could run into some problems finding ample opportunities.  The IAAF lists only six “IAAF Indoor Permit” races this season, three of which are on the same weekend.  Of course that doesn’t include the Millrose Games and other non-IAAF affiliated meets, but I’m guessing she will want to attempt it at a bigger budget meet.  All this to say, Millrose should pay her a bunch of money to race for the record against Chris Johnson, Denard Robinson and Adrian Peterson.

-The international field for the Boston Marathon was released today.   Things got a bit tougher for Ryan Hall, Shalane Flanagan and the rest of the Americans.

-Alan Webb explains his new training under Jerry Schumacher of the Oregon Track Club Elite group in Portland.  Schumacher is Webb’s fifth coach since high school.

-Ken Goe’s links from Monday.

-The next stop on the Mary Cain Show will be Boston for the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix.

The Morning Run- June 5th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Tyson Gay will make his 2012 debut in New York at the Adidas Grand Prix on Saturday.  Gay will be in the “B” section and will not be racing head-to-head with 2011 world champion Yohan Blake.   Gay, and his agent Mark Wetmore, cited preparedness issues as the reason he would not be racing in the premiere section.  In the same article, Wetmore says that Gay could be ready for something in the 9.9s on Saturday.

Whether or not that is realistic is debatable, but the fact that it is even being considered seems to undermine the unpreparedness  argument for why Gay needs to be in a separate section.  Nobody begrudges him if he needs a tune-up race and can’t touch a sub-10 yet, but claiming he isn’t race-ready and then floating 9.9 is highly contradictory.  Regardless, this should be the most anticipated “B” section of 2012

The most recent start lists for New York can be found here.

The NCAA Championships begin on Wednesday and run through Saturday.  Track and Field News produced women’s and men’s form charts.

The most recent start lists for the Bislett Games, Oslo’s stop on the Diamond League have been posted.  Some races to keep an eye on:

Can Usain Bolt improve on his world leading 9.76 in the 100 “against” Asafa Powell

Lolo Jones will try to get back on track in the 100 hurdles against Sally Pearson, Kristi Castlin, Tiffany Porter and Jessica Ennis.

Kenenisa Bekele, Tariku Bekele, Dejen Gebremeskel, Imane Merga and the rest of the strong Ethiopian contingent will battle for Olympic spots in the men’s 5000. 

American Morgan Uceny will try to close the gap on breakout Ethiopians Abeba Aregwai, Genzebe Dibaba in the 1500.    

Ken Goe’s links from Monday.

Writer David Davis is writing a book on the first woman to run a marathonMerry Lepper.  Hard to believe it was in 1963.

Start list for the Portland Track Festival, which features Dathan Ritzenhein and Lauren Fleshman.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- June 3rd

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Prefontaine Classic concluded yesterday at Hayward Field in Eugene with its typical array of fast times and competitive races.  Aside from that, the meet also featured Liu Xiang attempting to dance, Allyson Felix bringing back the bodysuit and Abubaker Kaki shaving a Nike swoosh into his hair (at about 2:05).

Full results from the meet can be found here.

Much of our post-race discussion on the live chat centered around the uncertainty of the American men in the 1500.  Andrew Wheating, Lopez Lomong and Leo Manzano were all non-factors in the Bowerman Mile, as was Bernard Lagat, who will be focusing on the 5,000 at the Olympic Trials.  Friday’s International Mile did not provide many answers, as Matt Centrowitz looked rusty. David Torrence and Russell Brown were the lone bright spots, but neither has made an international team.

Justin Gatlin won the 100 in 9.90 and appears ready, willing and able to take on the villain role throughout the summer.  His past history of doping (of which he has never admitted) stands in stark contrast with the charisma and universal popularity of Usain Bolt.  9.90 is a long way from the 9.76 Bolt just ran in Rome a few days ago in Rome, but Gatlin is putting up consistent enough times that he could pose a threat.  Also, the two seem to have some history (see the last 5 paragraphs of this story where Bolt alleges Gatlin spit in his lane at a meet last year).

With each race it becomes clearer that Gatlin will make the American squad for London.  Tyson Gay has yet to surface and Walter Dix suffered an injury yesterday that casts some doubt on his form.  Even accounting for those two, it is tough to envision a scenario where Gatlin is outside the top three.  An even more difficult proposition is seeing a way that Gatlin, even in the red, white and blue in London, is fully embraced by American fans, much less the world.  Not so much for the doping past and the brash statements, but because he will be in opposition to Bolt, the track and field uniter.

Ken Goe’s meet story focuses on Mo Farah and Galen Rupp’s performances in the 5,000.

George Schroeder on the excitement of Liu Xiang.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 18th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

There is still about 1 day to get in the House of Run fantasy track and field league.  If you would like to join, go here and join the league “House of Run Podcast.”  The league pin is 167961.  Make your picks for Shanghai!

There are two meets to keep an eye on this weekend.  First, the Occidental High Performance meet on Friday will have 800, 1500, 5000 and 3000 steeplechases races featuring many of the fastest Americans.  I will be helping out with the free, live coverage that begins at 6:30 pm PST.

The Diamond League’s second stop is Saturday’s meet in ShanghaiJoe Battaglia of NBC Olympics runs down all the races to watch and the storylines to follow.

Asafa Powell says, “Many track and field people know that if I stay relaxed and run my race like I’m supposed to, I will be the winner at the Olympic Games.”  The “ifs” have always been Powell’s problem.

Flotrack interviews the 2011 triple jump world champion, Christian Taylor.

Ken Goe’s links from Thursday, including a brief interview with Jerry Schumacher, the coach of the Oregon Track Club/Portland.

Bonnie Ford of ESPN interviews the American marathon Olympic team.  The key revelations are that Ryan Hall knows exactly how far the Olympic village is from the stadium, Abdi Abdirahman thinks a four-mile walk is a workout, and Meb Keflezighi is no fan of U-turns.

Rich Perelman wants a NCAA track and field playoff.

Paavo Nurmi’s win in the 1924 5,000 makes The Guardian’s “50 Stunning Olympic Moments” list.

I’m off to Oxy (and to eat here first)!

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 9th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our podcast from yesterday, which started as a recap of the results from Kingston, but ended as a referendum on the movie Without Limits, is up.

The IOC will retest doping samples from the 2004 Olympics.

The Guardian speculates about a potential match-up between David Rudisha and Usain Bolt in the 4 x 400 at the Olympics.  Throw in Oscar PistoriusLashawn Merritt and Dai Greene and we would have something akin to a running apocalypse.   Also, you have to love Rudisha’s epic understatement, “Bolt is fast, he has speed, that I don’t have.”

Bolt says he needs to run fast and win in London.  Not sure why this still qualifies as news.

Joe Battaglia profiles Julius Yego, the Kenyan javelin thrower.

Carmelita Jeter, Yohan Blake and Novelene Williams-Mills will all be running at today’s Cayman Invitational.

The preliminary start lists for the Oxy High Performance meet are out.  The mid-distance races are filled with big names.

Does Asafa Powell get a fair shake in Jamaica?  I vote yes, almost too fair.

Jesse Squire names another member of his Dual Meet Hall of Fame.

Ken Goe’s Tuesday links.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 4th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

In light of Rich Perelman’s post about track and television yesterday, Ken Goe’s lead in to his morning links is particularly perceptive and spot-on.  As has been said many times before, the control and focus of the sport lies with the coaches and athletes, when it should be geared toward the fans.

Saturday’s Jamaica Invitational will be a great opportunity to see many Olympic favorites, including Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Sanya Richards-Ross and Carmelita Jeter.  The meet begins at 8 pm EST/5 pm PST and will be streamed live (for free) here.

Glen Mills, coach of Bolt and Blake, think the two can coexist and flourish in the same training group, despite the naysayers.

Sanya Richards-Ross relives the 4 x 400 from the Beijing Olympics.  Spoiler, the US still catches Russia on the homestretch.

Tim Layden analyzes the components of the 100-meter dash in this NPR feature.

Martin Bingisser provides 10 reasons why you should watch the hammer throw in 2012.  The 11th reason should be keeping tabs on Martin’s own quest for a fourth consecutive Swiss national championship, while being a full time tax attorney.

American distance runner Chris Solinsky will not compete in the Olympic Trials due to injury.  He seems upbeat, but four years is a really long time to wait.

Lashinda Demus tells USA Today about the Olympic Trials, having her mom as a coach, drug testers and more.

Joe Battaglia digs deeper into Patrick Makau’s exclusion from the Kenyan marathon team.

Polakoff Communications lists “5 Things Every Athlete Needs to Know Before London.”  Bring your own food, was not listed.

The Penn Relays enjoyed its best television ratings since 2003

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 21

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Plenty of action this weekend on and off the track.  The London Marathon is on Sunday and, as Nick Zaccardi of Sports Illustrated points out, many of the world’s top track runners will also be in action.

First to the marathon.  The full elite men’s and women’s fields courtesy of Athletics Weekly.

Predictions from this week’s podcast.

Kevin:

Men: Vincent Kipruto, Emmanuel Mutai, Tsegay Kebede

Women: Mary Keitany, Florence Kiplagat, Ejegayehu Dibaba

Jason:

Men: Emmanuel Mutai, Tsegay Kebede, Patrick Makau

Women: Mary Keitany, Edna Kiplagat, Aberu Kebede

I stuck with the chaos theory theme of this year’s marathon season and chose Vincent Kipruto to upset all four of the Kenyans still in Olympic consideration.  Even with a win, Athletics Kenyan is still likely to choose from the original six of Geoffrey Mutai, Emmaneul Mutai, Moses Mosop, Wilson Kipsang, Abel Kirui and Patrick Makau.   Here is what needs to happen for each to qualify:

Geoffrey Mutai: Since his DNF in Boston, all Mutai can do is wait and watch on Sunday.  His phenomenal 2011 should count for something, so he is probably safe unless 3 or more Kenyans dip under the 2:04:30 mark in London.

Moses Mosop: Like Geoffrey Mutai, Mosop has already raced his spring marathon (3rd place in Rotterdam) so his Olympic hopes rest on the performances in London.  However, Mosop needs much more help than G. Mutai.  Some modest times combined with upsets (Lel or Kipruto being the top Kenyan for example) are his only path to the top three.

Emmanuel Mutai: The defending London Marathon champion benefitted from Geoffrey Mutai’s and Moses Mosop’s losses, but most likely he still needs to finish in the top three and beat at least two of the three top Kenyans racing (Makau, Kirui, Kipsang).  He may also be able to squeak in with a lower place, if the times are very fast (under 2:04) and he finishes well amongst his countrymen.

Patrick Makau:  Like Mutai, I think he can only lose to one Kenyan on Sunday and still be in a good position for selection.  Despite holding the world record, his Berlin performance came in a paced race against a weaker than expected field.  He has wins over Geoffrey Mutai from 2010, but I doubt those carry much weight now.  As it stands, he is ahead of Kipsang and Kirui, so a loss on Sunday to either of those two, would probably mean he is off the team.

Abel Kirui:  Based on time, Kirui is least credentialed of the six.  He has won two world championship titles, which is the only reason he is still in consideration for a berth.  I think he needs a top 3 overall performance as well as the second Kenyan to have any hope of jumping over the others.

Wilson Kipsang:  No major marathon wins and no wins against the other five in consideration make Kipsang a darkhorse  to make the team.  He was just seconds off the world record in Frankfurt, but, like Makau, it was done in a paced race.  It is hard to envision him getting the nod over Makau, or either of the Mutais unless he has a decisive victory and runs under 2:04 again.

The rest of the Morning Run:

Caster Semenya qualified for the Olympics, surprising nobody except for the editors at Fox.

Cam Levins beat Lawi Lalang in the 5,000 at Mt. SAC last night and earned the Olympic “A” standard in the process.

Kenyan 800 meter stars David Rudisha and Pamela Jelimo recorded wins in the 400.

Friday’s Oregon Relays action featured a fast 1500 by Sally Kipyego.

Ken Goe’s Saturday links.

LA Times feature on Brittney Reese titled “Brittney Reese hopes to be leaps and bounds above the rest.”  Because she is a long jumper.

Headline writers, yearbook editors and any others in charge of “punny” titles to articles.  Please avoid the following:

-“___________ raises the bar” (high jump/pole vault)

-“___________ clears hurdles/obstacles on/off the track” (hurdles)

-“____________ is on the fast track” (sprints)

-“_____________ goes the distance” (distance)

Enjoy your London Marathon, Mt. SAC Relays, Kansas Relays, Oregon Relays, Tom Jones Meet weekend!

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 20th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

NBC released the full Usain Bolt feature from Rock Center.

Joe Battaglia of NBC Olympics discusses “Kenya’s final four,” before the London Marathon.

One of those four, Emmanuel Mutai, appears to be well after contracting typhoid.

Battaglia also writes about the Ethiopian Olympic marathon selection process.  Or lack thereof.

Evan Jager shook up the American steeplechase landscape last night when he debuted with an 8:26 clocking at Mt. SACJim McDannald of Track Focus has more details.

More Mt. SAC, Stephen Sambu of Arizona ran 28:06 in the invitational section of the 10,000 and lapped pretty much everyone else in the process.

A very honest Tyson Gay says that even a gold medal may not make him happy.  Strangely, this story didn’t find its way on to the “100 days ’til London!” extravaganza.

Dai Greene’s agent responds to Bershawn Jackson’s trash talk.  In a brilliant stroke, agent Jaime Baulch said that Greene, “has always respected the Americans,” but also added that Jackson’s comments were, “a little bit over the top and typically American.”  Typically American?  I’m guessing the next round of chatter between the two camps will include some Stamp Act references.

Dwain Chambers appears to be cleared to run in the Olympics.

Ken Goe’s Friday links.

-Kevin