Tag Archives: lawi lalang

The Morning Run: January 28th

-Remember at the end of Without Limits when it says that at the time of Steve Prefontaine’s death, he held every American record between 2,000 and 10,000 meters? After running 3:50.92 for the mile indoors on Saturday, Galen Rupp is reaching that level of American dominance.

-Mary Cain continues her record book reconstruction tour and easily takes down the high school mile record at the New Balance Games.

-In Glasgow, Duane Solomon set the American record in the 600, Bernard Lagat won the 3,000 and an unknown defeated Carmelita Jeter in the 60.  You can find all of the videos here.  In the team competition, Russia and the United States tied with 58 points. Run-off or coin flip?  Neither?  Boo.

-Mo Farah will run the New Orleans Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon in February.  Sure he beat the Bekele brothers, but how will he fare against 9 guys racing in Mardi Gras costumes? 

-First, Dayron Robles was sitting out 2013.  Then, he was retiring.  Now it sounds like he may just be doing some sort of NBA/NFL style holdout and plans on returning in 2014 for a new country. If Cuba is looking for a trade, it is definitely a buyer’s market for hurdlers right now.

-Jesse Squire highlights two overlooked performances of the weekend, Lawi Lalang in the 3,000 and Cas Loxsom in the 600, in his Weekly College Awards. 

The Morning Run: January 10th

The Morning Run is a compilation of links, news and commentary.

We posted our latest podcast yesterday. Topics include Ryan Hall running the Boston Marathon, the indoor television schedule, the fight at the Armory and Bev Kearney’s resignation.

Tuesday’s list of top moments of running-related violence neglected to mention Josephat Machuka punching Haile Gebrselassie in the head at the 1992 World Junior Championships. Thanks to reader Matthew B. for brining this to my attention.

An extreme race became too extreme for some participants in Washington and now there are lawsuits. This is just what Bill Bowerman dreamed of when he helped spark the running boom in the United States.

Construction begins Saturday on the first tartan track in Iten, Kenya. Iten is the home of Lornah Kiplagat, Wilson Kipketer, Mary Keitany, Linet Masai, David Rudisha….wait, they got this good without access to a professional track?

Galen Rupp and Matt Centrowitz will run the mile at Saturday’s University of Washington Indoor Preview.

Bernard Lagat, Lawi Lalang, Cam Levins, Evan Jager, Dathan Ritzenhein and German Fernandez are among the entrants for the Millrose Games two-mile on February 16th. Before we get too excited, remember that we will still be in the “I’m still just in my base phase” portion of the season.

Millrose also announced that Jason Richardson and Andrew Riley will race the 60-meter hurdles.

Marathoner Ryan Vail is the subject of a short documentary. He probably is the fastest marathoner/shoe store employee in the country.

Peter Vigneron discusses the role, or lack thereof, that marketability plays in elite athlete sponsorships.

The Bowerman released their men’s preseason watch list. I would put my money on someone who does more than one event. Three of the past four winners doubled and the fourth was named Ashton Eaton.

The Morning Run- April 21

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Plenty of action this weekend on and off the track.  The London Marathon is on Sunday and, as Nick Zaccardi of Sports Illustrated points out, many of the world’s top track runners will also be in action.

First to the marathon.  The full elite men’s and women’s fields courtesy of Athletics Weekly.

Predictions from this week’s podcast.

Kevin:

Men: Vincent Kipruto, Emmanuel Mutai, Tsegay Kebede

Women: Mary Keitany, Florence Kiplagat, Ejegayehu Dibaba

Jason:

Men: Emmanuel Mutai, Tsegay Kebede, Patrick Makau

Women: Mary Keitany, Edna Kiplagat, Aberu Kebede

I stuck with the chaos theory theme of this year’s marathon season and chose Vincent Kipruto to upset all four of the Kenyans still in Olympic consideration.  Even with a win, Athletics Kenyan is still likely to choose from the original six of Geoffrey Mutai, Emmaneul Mutai, Moses Mosop, Wilson Kipsang, Abel Kirui and Patrick Makau.   Here is what needs to happen for each to qualify:

Geoffrey Mutai: Since his DNF in Boston, all Mutai can do is wait and watch on Sunday.  His phenomenal 2011 should count for something, so he is probably safe unless 3 or more Kenyans dip under the 2:04:30 mark in London.

Moses Mosop: Like Geoffrey Mutai, Mosop has already raced his spring marathon (3rd place in Rotterdam) so his Olympic hopes rest on the performances in London.  However, Mosop needs much more help than G. Mutai.  Some modest times combined with upsets (Lel or Kipruto being the top Kenyan for example) are his only path to the top three.

Emmanuel Mutai: The defending London Marathon champion benefitted from Geoffrey Mutai’s and Moses Mosop’s losses, but most likely he still needs to finish in the top three and beat at least two of the three top Kenyans racing (Makau, Kirui, Kipsang).  He may also be able to squeak in with a lower place, if the times are very fast (under 2:04) and he finishes well amongst his countrymen.

Patrick Makau:  Like Mutai, I think he can only lose to one Kenyan on Sunday and still be in a good position for selection.  Despite holding the world record, his Berlin performance came in a paced race against a weaker than expected field.  He has wins over Geoffrey Mutai from 2010, but I doubt those carry much weight now.  As it stands, he is ahead of Kipsang and Kirui, so a loss on Sunday to either of those two, would probably mean he is off the team.

Abel Kirui:  Based on time, Kirui is least credentialed of the six.  He has won two world championship titles, which is the only reason he is still in consideration for a berth.  I think he needs a top 3 overall performance as well as the second Kenyan to have any hope of jumping over the others.

Wilson Kipsang:  No major marathon wins and no wins against the other five in consideration make Kipsang a darkhorse  to make the team.  He was just seconds off the world record in Frankfurt, but, like Makau, it was done in a paced race.  It is hard to envision him getting the nod over Makau, or either of the Mutais unless he has a decisive victory and runs under 2:04 again.

The rest of the Morning Run:

Caster Semenya qualified for the Olympics, surprising nobody except for the editors at Fox.

Cam Levins beat Lawi Lalang in the 5,000 at Mt. SAC last night and earned the Olympic “A” standard in the process.

Kenyan 800 meter stars David Rudisha and Pamela Jelimo recorded wins in the 400.

Friday’s Oregon Relays action featured a fast 1500 by Sally Kipyego.

Ken Goe’s Saturday links.

LA Times feature on Brittney Reese titled “Brittney Reese hopes to be leaps and bounds above the rest.”  Because she is a long jumper.

Headline writers, yearbook editors and any others in charge of “punny” titles to articles.  Please avoid the following:

-“___________ raises the bar” (high jump/pole vault)

-“___________ clears hurdles/obstacles on/off the track” (hurdles)

-“____________ is on the fast track” (sprints)

-“_____________ goes the distance” (distance)

Enjoy your London Marathon, Mt. SAC Relays, Kansas Relays, Oregon Relays, Tom Jones Meet weekend!

-Kevin

The Morning Run- April 9th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Saturday marked the unofficial beginning to the outdoor season, at least in terms of elite distance races.  At the Stanford Invitational, pros Jackie Areson and Dathan Ritzenhein starred in the 5,000 and 10,000. Ritzenhein ran, and won, his first on the track since 2009 and Areson achieved the Olympic “A” standard with a fast last lap.

The race of the meet was Stanford’s Chris Derrick edging Arizona’s Lawi Lalang in the 1500.

Good sprint and hurdle results from the Florida Relays in Gainesville. 19 men broke 21 seconds in the 200.

Flotrack’s Ryan Fenton caught up with David Oliver after his hurdle race.

Prep Marvin Bracy false started and was disqualified in the 100, but provided a great sound bite when he told Flotrack his goal for the Olympic Trials was not just to gain experience, but to “actually go and beat every single last one of them” (1:40 in the video).  The presence, and success, of Bracy (and Jeff Demps) at the Trials would certainly add story lines and firepower to a 100 meter field that is lacking intrigue and mainstream appeal.  The downside? The ensuing onslaught of football fans who insist that ever member of the NFL could break 10 seconds if they actually trained for it would be quite insufferable.

Ken Goe’s story on the Pepsi Team Invitational where the Oregon men and women won the team titles.

The Eugene Register-Guard’s George Schroeder wrote about Duck sprinter English Gardner.  Sorry about the overload of Oregon stories on The Morning Run, but their beat writers and columnists actually cover track and field.

The second part of Alberto Salazar interview with Runner’s World.

Hammer thrower (and House of Run’s Chief Throws Correspondent) Martin Bingisser says there are positives and negatives to hosting the Olympic Trials hammer competition in Portland.  I say mostly negative, but Martin knows more about these things than I do (and is also much, much stronger).

Profile of Kenyan Florence Kiplagat, who will be racing the London Marathon.