Tag Archives: london olympics

The Morning Run- April 19th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

For some reason, there was a large amount of coverage of Olympic track and field athletes yesterday.  Still trying to figure out why.  In the meantime, here is The Morning Run, 99 days before the London Olympics kick off!

Usain Bolt was featured on NBC’s Rock Center.  This is a web exclusive of the piece and an additional segment on the importance of yams.

Not to be outdone, the BBC, with Michael Johnson, also profiled Bolt.

Ato Boldon and Joe Battaglia examine all the phases of Bolt’s race, while also sizing up his closest competitors.

On NBC’s Today Show, world champion Jason Richardson tries to teach Savannah Guthrie to clear a hurdle.  And she failed.   The running under the hurdle trick is so 10th grade.

All sports will be streamed live for the London Olympics.  Let’s hear it for the internet!

Bershawn Jackson takes aim at Britain’s Dai Greene.  I was curious when, and if, someone on the US team would stick up for Lashawn Merritt after Greene called Merritt a cheat.  Jackson answered that emphatically and then some.

Video previews of the men’s and women’s races for Sunday’s London Marathon by race director David Bedford.

Emmanuel Mutai was diagnosed with typhoid during his preparations for  the London Marathon.  Naturally, Jason and I both picked him for a top 3 finish.

George Schroeder follows up with Jason Hartmann after his career performance at Boston.

If Olympic Trials are held in Kenya, and nobody shows up to race, did it really happen?

Kansas Relays shot put recap and video.  Yes, to answer your questions, there is a Charlie Weis cameo.

Sprinter Wallace Spearmon is profiled.

Desiree Davila video and story from ESPN.

Ken Goe reports that Oregon and Arkansas are planning a dual meet to take place within next year’s Oregon RelaysVin Lananna says that it will be “all-out” and that they “won’t rest anybody.”  Bold statements, but also fairly easy things to say when the meet is a year away.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 12th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Our most recent podcast is here.  In it, Jason and I discuss the Stanford InvitationalFlorida Relays, the upcoming Boston and Rotterdam marathons and the trailer to the movie “Fast Girls.”

David Epstein of Sports Illustrated wrote a fantastic article on the late Sammy Wanjiru.  Epstein also appeared on the Sports Illustrated podcast.  I highly recommend both.

Philip Hersh reports that sprinter Marshevet Hooker is pregnant and will not compete at the Olympics.  Hooker was on the 2008 team and was 8th at last year’s World Championships.  Nick Zaccardi of Sports Illustrated points out that Hooker’s absence potentially makes room for collegians English Gardner and Octavious Freeman.  However, Hooker’s experience, and speed, will be missed on the 4 x 100 relay where the US is trying to beat the Jamaican squad for a second year in a row.  It was Hooker’s leg last year (3rd leg) that blew the race open and carried them to victory.

Australian pole vaulter Steve Hooker now trains in a “Bat Cave” and appears to be on the comeback after suffering from the “yips” in 2011.

A North Korean marathon exists…….and had a great finish……. and an interesting press release.  The winning time of 2:12:54 was well off King Jong Il’s 1:59:59 course record.

David Rudisha plans only three races before London.  Not sure if this includes the Kenyan Trials.

Lashawn Merritt wants to race NFL stars after his season is over.  I am sure there is a long line of NFL players just waiting to get exposed by Merritt in a 100.

The Kenyan 10,000 meter team, which will ultimately be decided in Eugene at the Prefontaine Classic, has cut the field down to 30.  Another 15 will be cut after a race in Kenya next week.

Guardian retrospective on the life and death of Florence Griffith-Joyner.

Yohan Blake and Asafa Powell are not racing this weekend, but will be at the same meet.  Who could have seen this coming?

Blake is planning to double in the 100 and 200 in London.  I will have more on this decision, and other key Olympic track and field decisions, on tomorrow’s Morning Run.

Science of Sport’s ”Around the Rings” column features 3 topics on running.

Pat Price reviews the documentary, “Town of Runners.”

After saying that she would be satisfied with a bronze, Paula Radcliffe now sees gold in marathon at London as “realistic.”  The British press have already begun salivating and frantically searching the internet for synonyms for “failure.”

The top American marks of the outdoor season thus far.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 10th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, Amby Burfoot of Runner’s World suggested changing the qualification procedure for the marathon in the Olympics.  Rather than base it on the three-per-nation limit, Burfoot wants a system where the best marathoners, regardless of nationality, all compete.  His full proposal is here, but the result for 2012 would be a field of seventeen Kenyans, two Ethiopians and one American.  By now, we are all well versed in the Kenyan and Ethiopian dominance of the event and how the Kenyan team this year will have to leave off several sub 2:06 performers.

Does the fact that the Olympics won’t have the deepest and best marathon in the world bother me?  Not entirely, because the Olympics aim to be about the participation of nations, rather than the greatest congregation of talent.  However, the real issue I have with Burfoot’s idea is that it doesn’t expand the field enough.

The tweak I would make to the race would allow Kenya (and other power countries) more entries than they hold currently, preserve the current state of the race and add a team component.  Here’s how it would work:

-Nation’s enter as five member teams.  This allows for two extra entries than the current system.  Does this mean there will still be deserving Kenyans and Ethiopians that will be left home? Certainly, but it is better to apologize to the 6th best than the 4th.

-In order to qualify as a team, at least 3 from your country must have met the “A” standard.  When looking at the numbers (keep in mind I did this just looking at 2011 times and for just the men’s field), only nine teams would qualify if all five members had to meet the “A” standard (Kenyan, Ethiopia, USA, Eritrea, Morocco, Japan, Russia, Poland, France), but if I opened it up to only three needing the standard, then nine more nations became eligible.  In these nations they often had several entrants that were just off the 2:15 “A” standard, so I didn’t feel that they overall competitiveness would be impacted by the presence of their 4th and 5th team members.

-Individuals from non-qualifying nations can still qualify by meeting the “A” standard.

-The team competition would be scored just like a cross country meet, except only the first four would count.  Medals would be distributed for the team competition as well as the individuals .

Obviously, there are many minor changes that could be made depending on the number of qualifiers and how many make the “A” standard on a given year.  If 18 teams made it, that would mean 90 runners would be a part of the team competition and it would still leave plenty of room for deserving individuals to represent their country.  The drama would extend from the front of the pack all the way to the back, and the US might even have a chance to snag a bronze every now and then.

The rest of The Morning Run…….

In The Sun’s article about Christine Ohuruogu, Allyson Felix says she is training for a double and is even considering racing the 100 instead of the 400, in addition to her favored 200.  She was .03 from a gold last summer in Daegu in the 400 and has never been a factor in the 100, so I’m a bit doubtful that she opts for the 100.

Ken Goe’s links.

Jesse Squire delivers his college awards from the past weekend.

Comedian Eddie Izzard runs with Haile Gebrselassie and discovers that Gebreselassie, and Ethiopia, are a bit confused by barefoot running.

Revealing Q and A with Usain Bolt where you discover that his training is in fact going well and that he wants to defend his Olympic titles in London.

More Bolt, he is scheduled to race a leg of the 4 x 100 this weekend at the UTech ClassicYohan Blake will run the 100 as well.

British marathoner Paula Radcliffe says she would be happy with a bronze at the Olympics.  That should take some pressure off.

Lolo Jones may not race in her home state at next weekend’s Drake Relays.

-Kevin