Tag Archives: london

The Morning Run: September 28th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

-This week’s podcast featuring Ryan Fenton of Flotrack.

-Two strange doping stories.  Athletics Kenya is investigating drug suspicions raised by a German journalist and the Independent Observer reports that many Olympic athletes missed blood tests in London and were not penalized.  Both stories could be nothing or they could be something.  Hope that answers your questions.

-Jesse Squire created a useful chart listing which NCAA cross country teams are competing where this weekend.

-NPR’s story about when Uwe Horn threw the javelin too far.

-British discus thrower Lawrence Okoye will not pursue opportunities in rugby or the NFL and will instead focus on throwing.  Another Okoye (who also had a history of throwing) was pretty successful on the gridiron.

-A photo of Liu Xiang crashing into the first hurdle at the Olympics is being used in a Chinese hospital’s flyer about men’s sexual disorders.  I thought they had censorship for things like this.

-Geoffrey Mutai will be looking for the world record in the marathon in Berlin on Sunday.  Even if he runs 2:02, I doubt Athletics Kenya will be impressed.

-ESPN2 will broadcast the New York City Marathon live on November 4th.

-This pile up from a cross country race in Alaska is phenomenal.

-Kevin

The Morning Run: August 17th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Stockholm Diamond League meet is today.  It is not the Olympics, but it does have Ryan Bailey and Nesta Carter facing off at 100 and Edwin Soi and Thomas Longosiwa tangling in the 3,000.  I know, I’m reaching.

Morgan Uceny won’t be running in Stockholm, Dick Patrick explains why.

Olympic silver medalist Erik Kynard was a guest on Letterman Thursday night.  The best exchange:

Letterman: Do you have kids?
Kynard: No, no, no, not that I know about. 

Lolo Jones was on ESPN’s Pardon the Interruption program.

A woman in France tested positive for EPO and also tested positive for best reason why she tested positive.

Olympic marathon champion Stephen Kiprotich received $80,000 upon his return to Uganda.  He was also promoted to the title of Assistant Superintendent of Prisons.  Well done, Mr. Assistant Superintendent Kiprotich.

Results from the DecaNation meet in France.

Ato Boldon’s candid remarks about Carl Lewis.

For good reason, Valerie Adams is probably the unhappiest gold medal winner from London.

Sporting good stores in Trinidad and Tobago are preparing for javelin sales to spike after Keshorn Walcott brought home a historic gold medal.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- June 14th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The second iteration of the Kenyan Olympic marathon controversy includes Patrick Makau’s agent releasing email contradicting the statements made by Athletics Kenya.

Joe Battaglia argues that conducting an Olympic Trials race for Kenya is the ultimate solution.  I second that.

Jesse Squire writes that the individual entities in track and field need to find common goals and USATF could use a communications manager.

Flotrack tours the grounds of the Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, California.  If you ever wondered where the next great American archer would be found, this video will answer some questions.

Pat Price asks America’s favorite rabbit, Matt Scherer, five questions.

The Jamaican Gleaner reveals their men’s picks for the Jamaican National Championships.  Including their controversial discus selection.

Ron Bellamy of the Eugene Register-Guard writes that Russell Brown is busy on and off the track.

The Indianapolis Star on Ashley Spencer not running in the Olympic Trials.  This story still continues to confuse me for a number of reasons.  If she does end up making the team for London, her season would only be two weeks longer then it will be if she makes it to Barcelona for the World Junior Championships.  That seems like a reasonable trade-off for the Olympic experience.

Second, the 400 is an event that is frequently dominated by athletes under the age of 20.  Sanya Richards-Ross finished 6th in Athens in 2004 when she was 19.  In those same Olympics, a 20 year-old Jeremy Wariner won gold.  Last year, Kirani James was 18 when he won the world title in Daegu. In “400 years,” Spencer actually isn’t that young and there is no guarantee she will be at this level again in 2016 or 2020.  That said, she is going to crush in Barcelona.

ESPNHS is folding.  This includes the popular high school running website, Dyestat.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin

 

Episode 22: Running Road Trip

Jason and Kevin review Bernard Lagat’s record, Chris Solinsky’s debut and Meb’s non-invite to the Boston Marathon.  Also, Runnerspace.com’s Jon Terzenbach joins the guys to give details of his 25 week running road trip.

Episode 5: Movers and Shakers

Jason and Kevin weigh in on the departure of Ryan Hall from the Chicago Marathon, the new candidate for USATF CEO and a running television show.

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