Tag Archives: mo farah

Episode 206: London Marathon Recap/Boston Marathon Preview

Jason and Kevin discuss Wilson Kipsang’s course record, Mo Farah’s debut, the dropped water bottle by Tirunesh Dibaba and all the other highlights of the 2014 London Marathon.  Is Kipsang now the best marathoner in the world?  Why was the criticism of Farah so harsh?  Did the pacemakers hurt both the men’s and women’s races?

Then, the guys look ahead to the Boston Marathon and weigh Shalane Flanagan’s bid to be the first American women’s winner in almost 30 years.  In the men’s race, Kevin wonders if anyone can contend with Dennis Kimetto and Jason’s breaks down Ryan Hall and Meb Keflezighi’s chances.

Episode 171: World Championship Grades with Nick Zaccardi of NBC Olympic Talk

Kevin is joined by Nick Zaccardi of NBC Olympic Talk to give out grades for the IAAF World Championships.  The guys discuss the performances by the American sprinters, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s dominance, Alysia Montano’s front running and the future of Mary Cain.  Also, Nick shares his opinion on Olympic mascots and the chances that Lolo Jones makes the Olympic bobsled team.

The Morning Run: January 28th

-Remember at the end of Without Limits when it says that at the time of Steve Prefontaine’s death, he held every American record between 2,000 and 10,000 meters? After running 3:50.92 for the mile indoors on Saturday, Galen Rupp is reaching that level of American dominance.

-Mary Cain continues her record book reconstruction tour and easily takes down the high school mile record at the New Balance Games.

-In Glasgow, Duane Solomon set the American record in the 600, Bernard Lagat won the 3,000 and an unknown defeated Carmelita Jeter in the 60.  You can find all of the videos here.  In the team competition, Russia and the United States tied with 58 points. Run-off or coin flip?  Neither?  Boo.

-Mo Farah will run the New Orleans Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon in February.  Sure he beat the Bekele brothers, but how will he fare against 9 guys racing in Mardi Gras costumes? 

-First, Dayron Robles was sitting out 2013.  Then, he was retiring.  Now it sounds like he may just be doing some sort of NBA/NFL style holdout and plans on returning in 2014 for a new country. If Cuba is looking for a trade, it is definitely a buyer’s market for hurdlers right now.

-Jesse Squire highlights two overlooked performances of the weekend, Lawi Lalang in the 3,000 and Cas Loxsom in the 600, in his Weekly College Awards. 

The Morning Run: January 18th

Because you can’t spend all your time reading about Manti Te’o….

-Jim McDannald of Track Focus reports that the Pac-12 is currently blocking Flotrack, Runnerspace and any other outside enterprise from streaming or archiving meets that are hosted by a Pac-12 school.  This decision gets even more puzzling when you consider that the Pac-12 may not even broadest these meets themselves.  This was the case at last Saturday’s University of Washington Indoor Preview.  Because of the large amount of college/professional meets that Pac-12 schools host, this policy would blackout fans from watching several marquee meets that have been previously available for viewing.

The development of propriety conference networks, and the huge amount of money that follows, is often cited as the savior of non-revenue sports.   It is interesting that these same networks could play a role in limiting the publicity of their schools and their athletes.

-Mo Farah will run one, and only one, indoor race this season.  Meanwhile, training partner Galen Rupp will race for the second time in 2013 at next Saturday’s BU Terrier Invite.

-Tirunesh Dibaba and Matt Centrowitz are the latest entries to the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix.

-Ken Goe’s Thursday links include a look at the relationship between Oregon’s football and track and field programs.

-Jesse Squire presents his College Notes.

-Our podcast from Wednesday where we discuss Mary Cain, the Boston Marathon field, Andy Murray’s acceleration and much more.

The Morning Run: September 6th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

-The start lists for the final Diamond League meet in Brussels are posted.  We promise this is the last track meet of the year.  Ok, there is Rieti is on the 9th, but that is it.

-Hubert Lawrence of the Jamaica Gleaner argues that countries that have earned multiple wild cards to the World Championships should not be limited to four entries.  This situation arises when the Diamond League champion and the defending world champion come from the same country (but aren’t the same person).  Lawrence cites the men’s steeplechase where Ezekiel Kemboi is the defending champion and Paul Koech will win this season’s Diamond League.  This could happen (or already has happened) in at least four different events:

Men’s 100 (Usain Bolt/Yohan Blake)

Men’s 200 (Nickel Ashmeade/Bolt)

Men’s 110 Hurdles (Aries Merritt/Jason Richardson)

Women’s 5000 (Mercy Cherono, Vivian Cheruiyot) 

The U.S. won’t be in this position in the women’s 200, but it is interesting that American Charonda Williams is on the brink of winning the Diamond League title in the 200.  She can clinch with a first or second place finish or if Bianca Knight finishes lower than first.  Williams didn’t make the finals at the U.S. Olympic Trials and her results this year from the Diamond League show that consistency, not dominance, can win you the title:

Shanghai: 5th

Oslo: 3rd

Paris: 3rd

London: 1st

Stockholm: 1st

Brussels: ??

Most American sprint fans probably aren’t familiar with Williams, but credit to her for making the most of the new wild card rule.   She capitalized on the absence of the big 200-meter stars and now looks poised to earn a trip to Moscow.  Perhaps others were not aware of this alternate route to the World Championships (this was the case with hurdler Dawn Harper) , but surely fewer will be in the dark next season.

-Jason and I tried to make sense of David Rudisha’s defeat, Oscar Pistorius’ comments and Paul Ryan’s marathon time in our latest podcast.  As always, you can subscribe/rate the podcast on iTunes.

-Days after the controversial post-race accusations by Pistorius, the South African Paralympic Committee has registered a formal complaint with the International Paralympic Committee.  That should calm things down.

-Olympians Amy Hastings, Janet Cherobon-Bawcom and Julie Culley will run the New York City Marathon in November.

-Haile Gebrselassie and Mo Farah were slated to race in the half-marathon at the Bupa Great North Run next weekend.  That was until Gebrselassie dropped out with an injury and Farah opted to run the two-mile instead.  Welcome to the imminent disappointment that is the off-season.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- June 3rd

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

The Prefontaine Classic concluded yesterday at Hayward Field in Eugene with its typical array of fast times and competitive races.  Aside from that, the meet also featured Liu Xiang attempting to dance, Allyson Felix bringing back the bodysuit and Abubaker Kaki shaving a Nike swoosh into his hair (at about 2:05).

Full results from the meet can be found here.

Much of our post-race discussion on the live chat centered around the uncertainty of the American men in the 1500.  Andrew Wheating, Lopez Lomong and Leo Manzano were all non-factors in the Bowerman Mile, as was Bernard Lagat, who will be focusing on the 5,000 at the Olympic Trials.  Friday’s International Mile did not provide many answers, as Matt Centrowitz looked rusty. David Torrence and Russell Brown were the lone bright spots, but neither has made an international team.

Justin Gatlin won the 100 in 9.90 and appears ready, willing and able to take on the villain role throughout the summer.  His past history of doping (of which he has never admitted) stands in stark contrast with the charisma and universal popularity of Usain Bolt.  9.90 is a long way from the 9.76 Bolt just ran in Rome a few days ago in Rome, but Gatlin is putting up consistent enough times that he could pose a threat.  Also, the two seem to have some history (see the last 5 paragraphs of this story where Bolt alleges Gatlin spit in his lane at a meet last year).

With each race it becomes clearer that Gatlin will make the American squad for London.  Tyson Gay has yet to surface and Walter Dix suffered an injury yesterday that casts some doubt on his form.  Even accounting for those two, it is tough to envision a scenario where Gatlin is outside the top three.  An even more difficult proposition is seeing a way that Gatlin, even in the red, white and blue in London, is fully embraced by American fans, much less the world.  Not so much for the doping past and the brash statements, but because he will be in opposition to Bolt, the track and field uniter.

Ken Goe’s meet story focuses on Mo Farah and Galen Rupp’s performances in the 5,000.

George Schroeder on the excitement of Liu Xiang.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin

 

Episode 23: Interview with The Oregonian’s Ken Goe/ USATF Indoor Championship Preview

The Oregonian’s Ken Goe joins Jason and Kevin to discuss Mo Farah’s move to Portland, Galen Rupp’s racing plans and the difference between the Oregon Track Club and the Nike Oregon Project.  Plus, Jason and Kevin preview their trip to Albuquerque for the USATF Indoor Championships.

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Episode 21: USA XC/New Balance Grand Prix

Jason and Kevin discuss the impressive performances from Shalane Flanagan and Brent Vaughn, marvel at the persistence of Dejen Gebremeskel’s left shoe and wonder about the current state of Alan Webb.

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Episode 20: Full Circle

Jason and Kevin evaluate the Millrose Games, Lukas Verzbicas’ decision and look forward to this weekend’s races in San Diego and Boston.

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