Tag Archives: olympic trials

The Morning Run: January 14th

Because USATF’s tiebreaking procedure is easier to understand than Jodie Foster’s speech at the Golden Globes.

-Sixteen-year-old Mary Cain ripped apart the American high school 3,000-meter record at the University of Washington Indoor Preview on Saturday.  Cain, who lives in New York but is coached by Alberto Salazar, ran 9:02.10 beating the existing outdoor record by over six seconds.  When considering conversions, she also bested all the existing high school records for the 3,200-meter and 2-mile.  The record itself isn’t a shock.  She already holds the 1,500-meter American high school record and held her own in the 800-meters at the Olympic Trials this past summer.   What is surprising is how fast she is running this early in the season.

Assuming that Salazar is using the same cautious and methodical approach that he has taken with Galen Rupp, it wouldn’t be a stretch to assume Cain can run much faster.  With modest improvements, she would be an immediate contender outdoors in the United States, especially in the 5,000, which currently lacks depth.  But before we get too far, let us remember all the phenoms in track and field who ran their best races and times before they reached the drinking age and were never heard from again.  Cain appears to be an exception.  Her talent surpasses anything we have ever seen in the United States and she has the best distance running coach in the world to provide guidance. Salazar deservedly received much credit for guiding Rupp over a 12-year period from a high school freshman to an Olympic silver medalist.  If he can get Cain anywhere close to that level while avoiding the injuries, burnouts and breakdowns that often fell such a talent, it would be an even greater coaching achievement

-Also in Seattle, the aforementioned Galen Rupp opened his 2013 season with a 3:57 mile and an easy win.

-Brianna Rollins of Clemson set the collegiate record in the 60-meter hurdles running 7.78.  That time is only .06 seconds from Lolo Jones’s American record of 7.72.

-Houston Marathon recap

Weather: Bad

Meb: Sick (DNS)

½ Marathon Winners: Feyisa Lelisa (1:01:52) and Mamitu Deska (1:09:51)

World record: Not close

Americans:  Shadrack Biwott (1:02:23) and Lisa Uhl (1:13:28)

Marathon Winners: Bazu Worku (2:10:17) and Merima Mohammed (2:23:37)

Americans: Andrew Carlson (2:17:16) and Tera Moody (2:39:10)

-Dayron Robles will apparently sit out 2013 in protest over treatment by officials in Cuba.

-Prep Erin Finn is feeling better after running a 10:18 3200 in a workout.

-A judge found Ashley Gill-Webb guilty of throwing a bottle onto the track before the men’s Olympic 100-meter final.  It doesn’t look like jail time is likely but he will have to live with the name “Olympic bottle thrower” the rest of his life.

-Jesse Squire’s Weekly College Awards feature Cas Loxsom and his 1:46 800.

The Morning Run: July 12th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Jason and I posted our weekly podcast yesterday.  We cover Usain Bolt’s injury, Tarmohgeddon, David Rudisha, the guy who thinks he can break two hours in the marathon and much more.

Tomorrow, the two-day London Diamond League meet begins.  Start lists are posted here.

18-year-old British sprinter Adam Gemili won the 100 at the World Junior Championships in 10.05.  He will compete for the host country in the Olympics. Jacko Gill also won.

The IAAF announced that Oscar Pistorius can run any leg of the 4 x 400 relay.  Last year, he was required to run first to “avoid danger to other athletes.”  This keeps my dream anchor leg situation intact with Pistorius vs. Bolt vs. Rudisha vs. Merritt vs. Greene.  The chances this actually happens, not good.  But…..

Gregg Doyel of CBS Sports, who has the most menacing byline photo on the internet, writes that Pistorius should not be allowed to run in the Olympics.

trailer has been released from the upcoming documentary, Usain Bolt: The Fastest Man Alive.  You can see sprint coaches cringing when Bolt explains how he looks side-to-side at least twice in his typical race.

Two Canadian hurdlers who didn’t make the Olympic team ask questions of the selection process.  I wonder why.

Olympic Trials champion, and prolific neck chalker, Reese Hoffa discusses the Olympics, juggling and his height in a USA Today interview.  Check out our interview with Hoffa from December 2011.  It is a good one.

Want to stream the Olympics online?  Read this first.

Usain Bolt’s agent, Ricky Simms, will now represent Galen Rupp.  Michael Johnson was Rupp’s previous agent.

My Athletic Life lists the Twitter handles for the entire American team.  50k race walker John Nunn is not listed.  Come on, John!!

I’m sure it is no consolation prize for missing the Olympics, but Walter Dix won the ESPY for best track and field athlete last night.

-Kevin

The Morning Run: July 6th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

If you are nostalgic for the Olympic Trials, you can always relive the action by listening to the daily podcasts we posted:

Day 1 with Jim McDannald of Track Focus

Day 2 with Joe Battaglia of NBC Olympics

Day 3 with Ryan Fenton of Flotrack

Day 4 with co-host Jason

Day 5 with Ato Boldon of NBC

Day 7 with Tim Layden of Sports Illustrated

Day 8 with Joe Battaglia of NBC Olympics

The Diamond League meet in Paris is today.  In a few hours in fact.  The meet will be headlined by David Rudisha’s attempt at another world record in the 800.

South African officials named Oscar Pistorius to the Olympic team in the 400 and the 4 x 400 relay.  Previously, they stated he would need to run under 45.30 twice this season to be eligible to represent South Africa (he has run under that time once this season).  Not a huge deal as he has run under the “A” standard in 2012 and 2011, but the waffling by governing bodies this year has been difficult to keep track of.  South Africa, Kenya and Ethiopia should unite under an umbrella organization called Arbitrary Athletics.

Usain Bolt will not run in the Monaco Diamond League.  He was planning using the race as his final tune-up before London, but appears to be nursing an injury after losing twice to Yohan Blake at the Jamaican Olympic Trials last week.

Courtesy of @JasonC1975, Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad doing what he does.

Over at the Daily Mail in Great Britain, there is apparently not much to write about.

Flotrack features Ryan Hall.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- June 12th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.  – June 12th

Moses Mosop withdrew from the Kenyan Olympic marathon team yesterday due to injury.  He will be replaced by MutaiEmmanuel Mutai.  Not Geoffrey Mutai the guy that crushed Emmanuel in New York about 7 months ago and who has the course records in New York and Boston.  Patrick Makau, the world record holder was also not chosen.  It took me awhile, but I finally figured out how to predict the decisions made by Athletics Kenya.  You take what is reasonable, logical and objective and then go with the complete opposite.

Olympian and war hero Louis Zamperini was on The Tonight Show last week.  These come courtesy of listener/reader Sam.  Incredible stuff, thanks Sam!

Track and Field News released their updated men’s and women’s  Olympic Trials form charts.

Mariya Savinova’s 1:57.95 800 was the headline from the Moscow World Challenge meet.

Fox Sports recounts the anguish and frustration of Wallace Spearmon after he was disqualified from the 200 in the Beijing.

Days after the end of 2012 campaign, Jesse Squire previews the 2013 NCAA track and field season.

Curtis Anderson of the Eugene Register-Guard looks at the Oregon Ducks who have Olympic Trials plans.

Pole vaulter Yelena Isinbayeva talks to Joe Battaglia about the 2008 Olympics.  On Skype nonetheless.

Bernard Lagat does some race visualization for NBC Olympics.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- June 2nd

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary

The second day of the Prefontaine Classic gets going at noon (PST) today on NBC.  Last night was an all distance affair.

Wilson Kiprop won the Kenyan Olympic Trials men’s 10,000 in an exciting stretch run over Moses MasaiBitan Karoki was third.  Although this race has been promoted as the trials race for Athletics Kenya, I would hardly say those names are set in stone.  As Joe Battaglia said on our podcast this week (and wrote about extensively), the controversy and inconsistency of the Kenyan marathon selection process leaves little to be confident about.  Even in the days prior to the 10,000, it was difficult to get a definitive answer on whether selectors would choose the first two or the first three from Friday’s race.

So congrats, Wilson Kiprop, Moses Masai and Bitan Karoki on making the Kenyan Olympic team!!!*

*Prices and participation may vary.  No purchase necessary.  Void where prohibited.  Subject to change without notice.  Other restrictions may apply.  For a limited time only.  Cannot be combined with any other offer.

The hyped International Mile fizzled when the pace lagged a bit behind the rabbits.  With one lap to go rabbit Jordan McNamara was visibly urging the pack behind him to pick up the pace.  Nobody really responded and Kenya’s James Magut won the race.  No “A” standards were achieved despite the effort of placing a second photo finish camera at the 1500 mark.  I hope they can get their money back for the camera.

Last season’s bronze medalist Matt Centrowitz made his outdoor debut and finished 8th in 3:57.44, his first race since the Millrose Games in February.  Last year, in his lead up to his surprise win at the U.S. Championships; he raced ten times between March and June.  This year, only once.

Prediciting the women’s 1500 at the Olympic Trials became a bit more difficult after Alice Schmidt held off Jenny Simpson for a 4:05.64 win.  Schimdt, who made the American team last year at 800 meters, also beat Anna Pierce, Shannon Rowbury and Gabrielle Anderson.  The American 1500 team looked very strong last year, with Simpson taking the gold and Morgan Uceny winning the Diamond League.  This year, the depth remains, but the task is much tougher.  Three women, two Ethiopian and one Kenyan, have already broken four minutes this season.  Nobody went under four in all of 2011.

Alysia Montano channeled the namesake of the meet and ran away with the women’s 800.  Montano ran an aggressive first lap of 55 seconds and then passed the rabbit en route to a 1:57.37.  This was her first race of the season and it puts her in the company of recent Diamond League winners Pamela Jelimo and Fantu Magiso.

It was closer than expected, but Tirunesh Dibaba won the women’s 10,000 in 30:24.39.  Kenyan marathoner Florence Kiplagat was just behind in 30:24.85.  This race was billed as the de facto Ethiopian Olympic Trials.  If that is the case, then Beleynesh Oljira and Werknesh Kidane will join Dibaba in London.

Full results of all races.

The Oregonian the Eugene Register-Guard recap day one.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- May 4th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

In light of Rich Perelman’s post about track and television yesterday, Ken Goe’s lead in to his morning links is particularly perceptive and spot-on.  As has been said many times before, the control and focus of the sport lies with the coaches and athletes, when it should be geared toward the fans.

Saturday’s Jamaica Invitational will be a great opportunity to see many Olympic favorites, including Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake, Sanya Richards-Ross and Carmelita Jeter.  The meet begins at 8 pm EST/5 pm PST and will be streamed live (for free) here.

Glen Mills, coach of Bolt and Blake, think the two can coexist and flourish in the same training group, despite the naysayers.

Sanya Richards-Ross relives the 4 x 400 from the Beijing Olympics.  Spoiler, the US still catches Russia on the homestretch.

Tim Layden analyzes the components of the 100-meter dash in this NPR feature.

Martin Bingisser provides 10 reasons why you should watch the hammer throw in 2012.  The 11th reason should be keeping tabs on Martin’s own quest for a fourth consecutive Swiss national championship, while being a full time tax attorney.

American distance runner Chris Solinsky will not compete in the Olympic Trials due to injury.  He seems upbeat, but four years is a really long time to wait.

Lashinda Demus tells USA Today about the Olympic Trials, having her mom as a coach, drug testers and more.

Joe Battaglia digs deeper into Patrick Makau’s exclusion from the Kenyan marathon team.

Polakoff Communications lists “5 Things Every Athlete Needs to Know Before London.”  Bring your own food, was not listed.

The Penn Relays enjoyed its best television ratings since 2003

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin