Tag Archives: veronica campbell brown

The Morning Run: January 8th

The Morning Run is a compilation of links, news and commentary.

-Ryan Hall will be racing the Boston Marathon this April.

-Boston’s New Balance Indoor Grand Prix added Galen Rupp, Jen Suhr, Dejen Gebremeskel and Hagos Gebrhiwet to their start lists.

-The fight during the boys 4 x 400 relay at the Hispanic Games on Saturday has once again put the issue of violence in running-related events in the spotlight.  Ok, not really.  Runners, jumpers and throwers are by and large a peaceful people and the incidents of them getting physical are remarkably rare.  I couldn’t even find enough good material to make a top five, so here are three notable track and field/cross country skirmishes:

*Note: The United States 4 x 100 relay team assaulting the baton after dropping it on numerous occasions, Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad pushing mascots, and Allyson Felix and Jenebah Tarmoh torturing our emotions were all not considered for this list.
 

In 2004, Florida State’s Antonio Cromartie, yes that Antonio Cromartie, pushed a Clemson runner off the track in the 400.  The gentleman from Clemson was not pleased.

In the 2011 World Cross Country Championships, Ethiopian and Eritrean runners “tussled” down the homestretch before awkwardly sprinting toward the finish line.

And finally, the gold standard.  Mehdi Baala and Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad fight exactly how would expect French distance runners to fight.

-While we are on the topic of violence, Edwin Rotich was tackled, or almost tackled, by a spectator in Brazil and still went on to win Kings Run in Sao Paulo.

-Nichole Porath, a 2012 US Olympic Trials finisher in the marathon, set a world record in the indoor marathon.  She ran 150 laps in 2:57:34 beating the old record by over 11 minutes.  Dizzying.

-No surprise, Veronica Campbell-Brown will not be racing indoors.

-Soon-to-be 2004 Olympic gold medalist Adam Nelson writes about structural changes that could improve track and field.

The Morning Run: August 21st

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

We have reached the “two degrees of Usain Bolt” portion of the season.  All Bolt all the time.  Minor league baseball player Billy Hamilton is the latest non-track runner who thinks he can beat Bolt in a race.  Get it line Billy, Usain will get to you right after he takes care of Denard Robinson, Chris Johnson and whoever else decides that they are somehow faster than the fastest man in the world.  Ever.

More Bolt, gold medalist Greg Rutherford said he would not be intimidated if Bolt took a shot at Rutherford’s specialty, the long jump.  Agree that Bolt’s switch to the long jump wouldn’t be as easy as most assume.  Disagree that Rutherford wouldn’t be intimidated if Bolt somehow found his way to the long jump runway.

Yesterday in Budapest, Sanya Richards-Ross won the 200, Jason Richardson took 110 hurdles and Christian Taylor got the win in the triple jump.

In Linz, Austria the big winners were Kirani James, Felix Sanchez, Charonda Williams, Ginnie Crawford, Hannah England and Nickel Ashmeade.

Want to relive the action from London 2012?  NBC Olympics has all the events archived here.

There are Diamond League meets this week in Lausanne and Birmingham.  Thursday is Lausanne and Birmingham is on Sunday.  The Lausanne meet has many Olympic champions and several high quality fields.

Bolt headlines the meet in the men’s 200 which also includes bronze medalist Warren Weir, Wallace Spearmon and Jason Young.

In the women’s 100, all of the London medalists will be on the start line.  Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, Carmelita Jeter and Veronica Campbell-Brown.  The men’s 100 features four of the eight Olympic finalists: Tyson Gay, Ryan Bailey, Richard Thompson and Yohan Blake.

-Kevin

The Morning Run- May 8th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Toni Reavis wants stadiums to turn off the Jumbotron.  Sometimes.

How much do track and field athletes make?  Jack Wickens tried to find out.

Preliminary start lists for the Doha Diamond League were released this morning for both men and women.  Most anticipation match-ups: David Rudisha vs. Mohammed Aman in the 800.  Shelly Ann Fraser vs. Veronica Campbell-Brown in the 100.  Kellie Wells vs. Brigitte Foster-Hylton in the 100 hurdles.  Silas Kiplagat vs. Asbel Kiprop vs. Nixon Chepseba vs. Abubaker Kaki in the 1500. Imane Merga’s elbows vs. the field in the 3,000.

Dick Fosbury’s flop, and gold medal, make the Guardian’s50 stunning Olympic Moments.”

Jeremy Wariner now considers himself under the radar in a 400 field that includes Kirani James and Lashawn Merritt.

Joe Battaglia succinctly recaps the weekend in track and field and road racing.

Dwain Chambers apologizes for at least the 300th time.

In a cool feature for the Independent, Ben Salmon goes through the same paces that track athletes will experience at the Olympic stadium.

Jesse Squire inducts Hayward Field into his Dual Meet Hall of Fame.  Finally, Hayward gets some recognition.

Pat Price asks Bridget Franek five questions.

In the most Scottish news of the day, a man in Chicago ran a half-marathon in a kilt.

-Kevin

 

The Morning Run- April 13th

The Morning Run is a daily compilation of links, news and commentary.

Yesterday, the Jamaican Observer wrote about Yohan Blake’s plans to double in the 100 and 200 at this year’s Olympics.  While not surprising, it got me thinking about which decisions will have the most impact on the competition in London.  After not including relays, or assumed doubles, such as Usain Bolt, Walter Dix, Carmelita Jeter, Mo Farah, Galen Rupp, etc. I narrowed it down to four:

Allyson Felix: 100/200, 200/400, 200,  400

Despite the articles and intimations to the contrary, attempting the 100 seems like a long shot for Felix.  After all, if she were going to put another race on her schedule that comes before her favored 200, then it would be the 400, where she narrowly missed gold in 2011.  If she does opt for the 100, her path out of the Olympic Trials got a little bit easier with the news that Marshevet Hooker will be taking the year off.

However, it seems very hard to believe Felix would put an extra race in her legs, both in Eugene and London trying to beat 100 meter specialists.  The more realistic option is between the 200 and 400.  She tried the double last year in Daegu and came up a bit short finishing 3rd and 2nd respectively, but even with the Olympic year resurgence of Sanya Richards-Ross and Christine Ohuruogu, the 400 is still not nearly as deep as the 200.

So why would she drop the 400, a race where was .03 seconds away from gold at the 2011 World Championships?  The idea of racing Veronica Campbell-Brown and Carmelita Jeter fresh has to be tempting.  As does winning gold in the 200 where she earned the silver medal at the last two Olympics.

Chances of:

100/200:  1%

200/400:  75%

400:            25%

200:            50%

Abubaker Kaki: 800 or 1500

As they overlap on the London program, this is most likely and either/or situation.  Kaki was the silver medalist in the 800 last year, but the man he lost to, David Rudisha, seems unbeatable.  His switch to the 1500 for the Olympics would make him the first to employ the ARAAC strategy (Avoid Rudisha At All Costs).  Most don’t have the ability to pull off the ARAAC, but Kaki ran 3:31 last year and is already entered in a 1500 for the first Diamond League meet.

What would be the ripple effect of Kaki’s switch?  Aside from Rudisha’s path getting easier, it would make Kaki a medal threat immediately in the 1500.  Throw him, and his closing speed, in the mix with Asbel Kiprop and Silas Kiplagat and the chances of an American medal decrease significantly as well.

Chances of…

800: 40%

1500: 60%

Kenenisa Bekele: 5,000, 10,000, 5,000/10,000, neither

We will definitely have more information about the form of the defending gold medalist after he returns to racing this weekend in Ireland. Bekele barely raced last year and dropped out of the 10,000 at the World Championships snapping his undefeated streak in that event in the process.  His 2011 wasn’t all bad though as he returned in Brussels to run the fastest time in the world (26:43).  Was that performance a sign to returned dominance or a final curtain call?

The answer should be much more obvious this year because he will have to show some positive results early in the season in order to get selected to the Olympic team.  Bekele’s presence in either event would make it much more difficult for Mo Farah to win in front of his home crowd and it would also mean that a highly qualified Ethiopian will be on the sideline.  In the 2011 World Championships, Ethiopia went 1st and 3rd in the 10,000 and 3rd and 5th in the 5,000 (they would have been 3rd and 4th had Imane Merga not been disqualified).  The 5,000 and 10,000 are separated by several days making the double manageable.

Chances of:

5,000: 25%

10,000: 85%

5,000/10,000: 65%

Neither: 10%

Yohan Blake: 100, 200 or 100/200

Why would a reigning world champion in the 100 not race the glamour event at the Olympic Games?  The answer is he probably still will, but maybe he should reconsider.  Blake’s 100 meter title last year was a bit diminished by the absence of Tyson Gay, Asafa Powell and Usain Bolt, and was overshadowed by his own post-World Championship 19.26 200 meter time.

His best in the 100 meters is 9.82.  Great, but does not put him in the rarefied air that his 200 does.  If he skips the 100, he will be racing fresh against many that will be doubling back from the 100.  When I floated this idea to Ato Boldon (at about 8:02 on the podcast) he politely told me I was completely wrong, so I am probably way off base.  The prestige and potential earning power is far greater in the 100, but if Blake does not show the ability to go 9.7 or 9.6 early in the season, he should give the 200, and just the 200, a serious look.

100: 65%

200:  25%

100/200: 75%

The rest of The Morning Run

Aries Merritt and his hair are profiled by Yahoo.

The Boston Herald explains why the top Americans will be on the sidelines for this year’s Boston Marathon.  Hint, the Olympics.

The IAAF preview of Boston.

Jesse Squire discusses the connection between Steve Prefontaine and dual meets.

Ken Goe’s links of yore.

More of the non-story that is the status of Delano Williams‘ citizenship.

A great analysis of Matt Centrowitz’s bronze medal race in Daegu.

-Kevin